Tag Archives: things to do

A Museum Outing With Your Book Club

Now that winter is upon us, a trip to a museum or indoor garden may be just the thing to refresh your book club and beat those winter blues.   Below is a sampling of current museum exhibits that are part of SPL’s Museum Pass Program. 

Museum of the City of New York

King in New York – through June 1, 2018

Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King Jr., King in New York traces the civil rights leader’s encounters with New York from the 1950s until his assassination in 1968. The exhibition’s historic images chronicle King’s sermons in churches and speeches to the United Nations, his discussions about race relations with New York City’s mayor, and his relationships with New York’s own networks of activists.

Beyond Suffrage:  A Century of New York Women in Politics – through August 5, 2018

This exhibit traces women’s political activism in New York City from the struggle to win the vote, through the 20th century, and into our own times. Beginning with the long battle for women’s voting rights that culminated in 1917 statewide and 1920 nationally, the exhibition highlights women at the center of New York’s politics over the course of 100 years.

Nassau County Museum of Art

Fool the Eye – through March 4, 2018

Get ready to be amazed by an exhibition filled with optical illusions and artistic sleight of hand! Trompe l’oeil, hypnotic abstractions, perceptual illusions, mind-bending impossibilities and more. Artists include Salvador Dali, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Vik Muniz and many others.

The Jazz Age – March 17, 2018 – July 8, 2018

The Jazz Age is highlighted by masterpieces of the 1920s, neoclassical paintings by Picasso, the avant-garde breakthroughs of James Joyce and Coco Chanel and enduring classics such as Balanchine’s Apollo. The exhibition also features musical and literary programs, lectures and symposia exploring the art, design, music, dance and literature of this unforgettable era.

New York Historical Society

Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence – through March 11, 2018

Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence showcases hand-drawn and engraved maps from the 18th and early 19th centuries that illuminate the tremendous changes—geographic, political, and economic—that occurred before, during, and just after the Revolutionary War.

The Vietnam War: 1945 – 1975 – through April 22, 2018

The New-York Historical Society presents a groundbreaking exhibition on one of the most controversial events of the 20th century: the Vietnam War. Populating a 3,000-square-foot gallery with interpretive displays, digital media, artwork, artifacts, photographs, and documents, the exhibit provides an enlightening account of the causes, progression, and impact of the war.

If your group is interested in any of these exhibits, our Readers’ Services Librarians would be happy to pair it with just the right book to couple your visit with a book discussion.

Museum passes can be reserved up to 60 days in advance with an adult Syosset Public Library card in good standing. Most passes admit 2 adults and 2 children.  To reserve a museum pass or to view our Museum Pass Guidelines in full detail, visit www.syossetlibrary.org and click on the museum pass icon or call (516) 921-7161 ext. 239.

*Exhibit descriptions provided by the museums. 

*This article first appeared in the February 2018 issue of Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider.       

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services                                                                       

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Afternoon Book Discussion

With Lisa Jones, Readers’ Services Librarian

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

1:30 PM               

Set at the end of World War II, in a crumbling Bavarian castle that once played host to all of German high society, a powerful and propulsive story of three widows whose lives and fates become intertwined. The Women in the Castle is a dramatic yet nuanced portrait of war and its repercussions that explores what it means to survive, love, and, ultimately, to forgive in the wake of unimaginable hardship.                           

 (from the publisher)

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services

 

What We’re Reading Now

Time to take a peek over the shoulders of members of our staff to see what they are reading at the moment:

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Presents a rendering of the major Norse pantheon that traces the genesis of the legendary nine worlds and the exploits of its characters, illuminating the characters and natures of iconic figures Odin, Thor, and Loki.

 

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

Living with an Old World mother and rebellious sister, an urban New Jersey misfit dreams of becoming the next J.R.R. Tolkien and believes that a longstanding family curse is thwarting his efforts to find love and happiness.

-Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.  But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble?and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

-Sue Ann,  Head of Children’s Services

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

Sneaking out to get readings from a traveling psychic reputed to be able to tell customers when they will die, four adolescent siblings from New York City’s Lower East Side embark on five decades of experiences shaped by their determination to control fate.

-Pam M., Assistant Library Director

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi (Evening Book Discussion, February 13)

Two half-sisters, unknown to each other, are born into different villages in 18th-century Ghana and experience profoundly different lives and legacies throughout subsequent generations marked by wealth, slavery, war, coal mining, the Great Migration and the realities of 20th-century Harlem.

-Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Robicheaux by James Lee Burke

While investigating a homicide, Dave Robicheaux, who is struggling with PTSD, alcoholism, and the loss of his wife, suspects he may have been the killer and endeavors to clear his name and make sense of the killing.

 

Two Girls Down ​by Louisa Luna

Hired by the devastated mother of two young girls who have gone missing from a small Pennsylvania town strip mall, enigmatic bounty hunter Alice Vega is rebuffed by the overextended local police and partners with disgraced former cop, Max Caplan, on a case involving a dangerous web of lies, false leads and complex relationships.

-Jean S., Readers’ Services Librarian

Robots vs Fairies ed. by Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe

A unique anthology of all-new stories that challenges authors to throw down the gauntlet in an epic genre battle and demands an answer to the age-old question: Who is more awesome—robots or fairies?

-Megan, Systems Manager

The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott

A portrait of the Irish-American experience is presented through the story of an Irish immigrant’s suicide and how it reverberates through innumerable lives in early twentieth-century Catholic Brooklyn.

 

The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict (Afternoon Book Discussion, Jan 30)

A tale inspired by the first wife of Albert Einstein follows the experiences of Mitza Mari, a female physics student at an elite late-nineteenth-century school in Zurich, where she falls in love with a charismatic fellow student who eclipses her contributions to his theory of relativity

-Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

Afternoon Book Discussion

“A tale inspired by the first wife of Albert Einstein, follows the experiences of Mitza Mari, a female physics student at an elite late-nineteenth-century school in Zurich, where she falls in love with a charismatic fellow student who eclipses her contributions to his theory of relativity.”

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

1:30 PM

With Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services

 This program is free.

No registration required.

Books available at the Circulation Desk one month prior to event.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

 

AUTHOR VISIT & SIGNING WITH ROBERT KARMON

Robert Karmon is an award winning playwright, published poet, short story writer and published screenwriter, who has worked on screenplays for Columbia pictures, CBS and Eddie Murphy Production.

Join us on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 2 PM to hear Mr. Karmon discuss his novel Isaac and the writer’s life.  Isaac, based on a true story of the Holocaust, follows the epic journey of a young boy from near-death to ultimate triumph as a man.

Copies of Isaac will be sold by

the Friends of the Library at the event (Cash Only).

This program is free.

No registration required.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be

used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

Our Book Displays- December

Well, it’s the Holiday Season and the Beginning of Winter…and our book displays reflect the season.

On the main floor “Happy Holidays” is the first display, filled with Christmas and holiday themed books and DVD’s.  Also included are non-fiction books with gift and crafts ideas and of course many cook books with recipes to celebrate both for Hanukkah and Christmas.

“Winter Potpourri” is the next book display and will appeal to hardier souls.  An eclectic array of books on winter sport, such as skiing, ice hockey, snowboarding and ice fishing.  Also included are travel guides to Alaska, Canada and the Artic. For the homebodies, the display has winter themed DVDs.

The mini displays are “Down But Not Out” more oldies but goodies and “Mysteries To Die For” – nothing like a good mystery to hold your attention.

 

On the third floor, “Healthy Holidays” is the theme of the first display.  It’s time to learn how to eat healthy during party time, make peace and become happier and avoid winter depression.  This display has many books on just these topics. There are also great handouts for a healthy holiday and safety tips. Definitely worth a trip to the 3rd floor.

The second display, “Be My Guest” has books on entertaining during this season.  Wow your guests with great craft and decorating ideas, fabulous food and creative entertainment ideas. The assortment of books here might show you how to do it all with less effort.

You can certainly get the holiday and winter season off to a great start with any of our book displays.

Wishing you happiness and health for the holidays and all year long!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Year-End Readers’ Services Celebration with Author Fiona Davis

photo credit: Kristen Jensen

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

2 PM

Join the Readers’ Services staff for a fun Year-End Celebration featuring Fiona Davis, author of the bestselling novels The Dollhouse and The Address. Ms. Davis will discuss her novels and the writer’s life. A book sale and signing will be held by the Friends of the Library at the event. Refreshments will be served. No registration required. Each attendee will receive a ticket to win a raffle prize.

“Fiona was born in Canada and raised in New Jersey, Utah, and Texas. She began her career in New York City as an actress, where she worked on Broadway, off-Broadway, and in regional theater. After ten years, Fiona changed careers, working as an editor and writer, and her historical fiction debut, The Dollhouse, was published in 2016. She’s a graduate of the College of William & Mary and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and is based in New York City

(From the author’s website).”

For more information about author Fiona Davis, visit her on social media: Website,  Facebook, Twitter,  and Instagram.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services