Tag Archives: things to do

Museums in the time of Covid-19, part 2

While you don’t have the pleasure of enjoying the magnificent Warburg House , you can experience the collection of The Jewish Museum. Audio tours highlight some of its treasures. You can also hear conversations with some artists. Just click on the “audio tours” button on the top bar of the homepage. The Cradle of Aviation Museum  offers a photo gallery of its exhibits and panoramic views of each room. Click through each to see the history of aviation from balloon baskets to space exploration.

Do you need a dose of fine art? The Heckscher Museum of Art’s collection online can be browsed by collection or searched by artist’s name. And the Museum of Modern Art has audio commentary about works in the collection and special exhibits.

While the Library does not have passes to The Metropolitan Museum of Art or to the American Museum of Natural History, their online offerings are impressive and a delightful way to while away some time. The beloved Met’s homepage feature “Experience the Met, Anywhere” offers many ways to enjoy the Met’s treasures remotely. There is the Timeline of Art History for an overview of art and global culture. Or check out a variety of audio guides for current exhibitions . If you want to experience the impressive museum galleries, take a look at some of the offerings of the Met 360° where you can visit the Great Hall, the Temple of Dendur as well as the Cloisters.

From home it is easy to get from the Met to the American Museum of Natural History. There’s no need even to cross Central Park! Just click to take a tour of the wonders of the American Museum of Natural History.  You can also enjoy the Google Arts and Cultural Tour ( I think the Pacific Northwest Coast People is a fascinating look at the collection process; and for some fun watch the video about the real life exhibits used in the “Night at the Museum” movies!)

No need to be bored during these days of semi-confinement. Explore, enjoy and learn!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

It’s a Perfect Time to Garden

Gardeners are optimists! Just think, they put a tiny seed in the ground and expect it to grow.

Gardeners are patient! That tiny seed might take a week or more before it sends up a reassuring green sprout and then a couple of months before is produces a crop or flower.

So, in these trying times perhaps thinking about gardening is a good idea. Now’s the time to plan.

When it warms up and the nurseries reopen, it will be time to purchase annuals. I love my perennials, but I always fill in the garden with colorful annuals. Check out the heights and color before you buy.

I love to do container gardening. I move the containers around all summer to cover up bare spots between flowering perennials. That means I always have color! This is a good time to look at the pots you have, discarding the damaged ones, cleaning the others so you are ready to fill them when it gets warmer. If you need some helpful hints, Check out Cornell Cooperative Extension’s factsheet. The Nassau County and Suffolk County Cornell Cooperative Extension sites offer a wealth of information for Long Island gardeners.

Do you want to get the kids involved? While we are stuck inside, help them paint rocks to use to decorate the garden. Start easy-to-grow seeds inside: Lettuce or basil germinate quickly. You can even use recycled containers like egg cartons and yogurt containers (a good introduction to Earth Day which we will celebrate in April).

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If you need something to boost your mood, try visiting some online gardens like the New York Botanical Garden and take a walk on the first day of spring  or take the time lapse walk along the Cherry Esplanade at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The very peaceful “A Day at the Garden” offers a look behind the scenes at the Portland (Oregon) Japanese Garden. You can also see the Strolling Pond Garden  and several other special places.

Researching these garden sites and finding each with the notation that the Gardens are currently closed to the public, is a reminder that we are all in this together. But enjoy the information we have online! And think like a gardener: be patient, be optimistic.

-Posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Museum visits from home!

Okay, so the museums are closed but if you love them, take a look at some of their online exhibitions.

The Museum of the City of New York is one of the least appreciated in the city, but its collections are impressive. Do you remember the 1939 World’s fair? If you were there or just heard about it, you can explore some the museum’s artifacts.

Do you enjoy a bit of Broadway? While the Great White Way remains dark, there are many digitized images available.

And the museum is offering videos at #MuseumFromHome highlighting some exhibitions, programs and original series.

You can visit the Frick! Take the virtual tour on the museum’s website.   And spend an enjoyable hour or more listening  to talks about the collection and special exhibitions.

Are you feeling cooped up and is Spring calling you? The New York Botanical Garden has recorded gardening lectures.  And you can sample the Garden’s wonderful plant collection by clicking through the photos online. 

Spring will come. This halt to our lives will end and the Syosset Library will look forward to loaning you our passes to the wonderful world of museums!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Evening Book Discussion

In Commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of Anne Frank’s Death

Tuesday, March 10, 2020
7:30 PM

with Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services

A timeless story that stands without peer, this definitive edition brings to life the world of a brilliant young girl who, for a time, survived the worst horrors the modern world has ever seen and who remained triumphantly and heartbreakingly human throughout her ordeal.

This program is free. No registration required.

Teens welcome!

Books  are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

Afternoon Book Discussion

 

 

In Commemoration of the 75th Anniversary

of the Liberation of Auschwitz

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

1 PM

with Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services

“A novel based on the true story of an Auschwitz-Birkenau survivor traces the experiences of a Jewish Slovakian who uses his position as a concentration camp tattooist to secure food for his fellow prisoners.” – from the publisher

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

Year-End Readers’ Services Celebration

with Author Kitty Zeldis

Tuesday, December 17, 2019 at 2 PM

Join the Readers’ Services Staff for an exciting Year-End Celebration featuring Kitty Zeldis, author of the 2018 novel Not Our Kind. Ms. Zeldis will discuss her historical fiction novel set in postwar New York City and the writer’s life. Refreshments will be served. All attendees will receive a ticket to win a raffle prize.

Copies of Not Our Kind will be sold by the Friends of the Library at the event (Cash Only). 

This program is free.

No registration required.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

Evening Book Discussion

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

7:30 PM

with Ralph Guiteau, Readers’ Services Librarian

“Bourdain spares no one’s appetite when he told all about what happens behind the kitchen door. Bourdain uses the same “take-no-prisoners” attitude in his deliciously funny and shockingly delectable book, sure to delight gourmands and philistines alike.” – from the publisher

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services