Tag Archives: recommendations

Five Years on the Blog: July

Welcome back to our regular monthly feature: A walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts for the past five years:

2016: Lake Reads

2015: Presidential Pardon

2014: Our Favorite Book Discussions

2013: Lollipop Farm to Roll Again!

2012: Dandelion Wine

Watch out for our next look down blog memory lane again in August!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Startup that BBQ!

For some of us, the Memorial Day weekend means returning to outdoor cooking. If you are looking for some inspiration for your holiday BBQ menus we might have a book for you.  Here are a few of the barbecue books from our cookbook collection which can be found on the main floor.

Weber’s Greatest Hits : 125 Classic Recipes for Every Grill by Jamie Purviance

Collects over one hundred barbecue recipes from the grilling company, including such offerings as grilled oysters, Korean beef barbecue, jerk-spiced ribs, and Greek seafood salad.

 

Best Grill Recipes Ever : Fast and Easy Barbecue Plus Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades by Daniella Malfitano

Features recipes for barbecuing meats and vegetables, along with recipes for marinades and rubs, including such options as cedar plank salmon with herb dressing, rib eye steak Tuscan style, caramelized bananas, and short-rib burgers.

 

Meathead: The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling, text and photos by Meathead Goldwyn; with Greg Blonder, Ph.D

The pitmaster, national barbecue cookoff judge, and curator of the world’s most popular barbecue website debunks the myths that stand in the way of perfect outcomes and reveals all the secrets every successful griller needs to know, from which wood chipsto use to which equipment to choose.

Master of the Grill: Foolproof Recipes, Top-rated Gadgets, Gear, & Ingredients plus Clever Test Kitchen Tips & Fascinating Food Science  by The Editors at America’s Test Kitchen

A guide to grilling and barbecuing features a wide variety of kitchen-tested recipes for meat, poultry, seafood, vegetables, and pizza, including such regional specialties as Texas smoked sausages, Alabama BBQ chicken, and Kansas City sticky ribs.

Grill Fire by Lex Taylor

The barbecue grill master teaches the art and technique of grilling, offering advice on butcher cuts, fuels, and fire along with techniques for mastering temperature and doneness, and includes a collection of globally influenced recipes.

 

Enjoy the Holiday Weekend!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Title Swap with Librarians

Second floor fireplace and seating area.

Please join us on Tuesday, June 6 at 1:30 PM

Share tea, coffee and cookies, as well as your favorite titles with the Readers’ Services staff of the Syosset Public Library.  Join librarians Jackie Ranaldo, Stacey Levine, Jean Simpson, Lisa Jones, Ralph Guiteau and Evelyn Hershkowitz for a fun hour of sharing the titles of our favorite books.

Looking for something particular?  Suspense?  Biography? Adventure?  Your next Book Club pick?  Ask the group … we promise you’ll leave with a great Summer reading list.  Not able to make the program?  No worries.  A list of the discussed titles will be left at each public service desk.  They will also be made available on our website.  We will be meeting on the 2nd floor right in front of our fireplace.

We look forward to seeing you there!

This program is free and no registration is required.

Can’t wait until then for a recommendation? Check out our past titles here.

– posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

What We’re Reading Now- Audiobook Edition

Most of us working here at the library love to read.  And some of us like to listen to our books from time to time.  Here are some audiobooks we have been enjoying lately:

Pam M., Assistant Library Director – 

“I am listening to 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster. It is the story of Archie Ferguson, a Jewish boy born in Newark in 1947,  and tells about four different alternative futures for him.  It is narrated by the author which makes the listening experience great because his voice is so believable as the voice of an older Archie.  It is 29 CDs, but I don’t want it to end – – you really look forward to hearing about Archie’s parallel lives and what comes next.”

Megan, Systems Manager

World War Z by Max Brooks. With a cast of over 20 famous actors doing the voices, including Alan Alda, Nathan Fillion, Simon Pegg, and Jeri Ryan, it was an amazing listening experience.”

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

“I have found an audiobook narrator that I love listening to.  Bahni Turpin has narrated some wonderful YA books such as The Sun Is Also a Star and Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon.  She is also the narrator of The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, which has won numerous awards including the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Literature.  My next audiobook will be The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas which is another YA book narrated by Ms. Turpin.”

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian

“I just finished listening to The Two Family House by Lynda Loigman.  The story is about two Jewish families living in Brooklyn during the 1950’s.  The narrator uses a “Jewish-Brooklyn” accent which adds to the sense of place and time.  Listening to an audiobook adds an emotional dimension to a story.”

Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

“I just finished Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson for the Afternoon Book Discussion. The narrator truly brought the characters to life.”

 

Lisa J., Readers’ Services Librarian

“I recently finished listening to The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher, a funny, poignant autobiography about Fisher’s early days making the first Star Wars Movie. A flawed but creative and talented person that left us too soon.”

Betty P., Reference Librarian

I’ll Take You There by Wally Lamb.  The book is about 7 hours long. It was short and entertaining.  The typical Wally lamb book concerning women’s issues.”

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian

“Every once in a while I like to listen to one of James Patterson’s books because they have brief chapters which makes it easier to listen to them in short spurts.  The one I am listening to now is The Black Book which had great reviews for its audio version.  I’m enjoying it because I am suspecting almost everyone, except the hero, of being the bad guy (or girl).”

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

 

April is National Poetry Month…

Do you like poetry? Come up to the Library’s third floor to sample a new poem. We have a bucket filled with copies of poetry for you to enjoy.

Can’t visit the library in person? May I suggest visiting the Library of Congress online? The venerable LC has so many hidden treasures. This month I suggest looking at Poetry 180.

This project by former Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a selection of poems for each day in the school year. Its target audience is high school students but it is open to everyone. It is a great way to discover new poets and their works:  “The Bagel” made me smile; every parent can identify with “To a Daughter Leaving Home.”

Poems are wonderful to read but they are even better when you hear them. So check out the LC’s Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature. This amazing source has audio recordings of many famous poets as well as lectures about poetry. There is an interview with Robert Frost (1959) which includes him reading some of his work. And Archibald MacLeish reads and comments on his poetry in 1963. You also can hear Margaret Atwood, Alan Dugan (I just discovered his “On the Long Island Railroad System”), Joyce Carol Oates, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Pinsky and Gwendolyn Brooks.

The Poetry Foundation  is another great resource. You can listen to the works by such people as Dylan Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar, John Dunne,Gerard Manley Hopkins and Robert Frost   You can search the Foundation’s collection of poems. They have a section of poems under 25 lines  and another section of poems by literary forms and terms.

Glance at any of these sites and you just might be inspired to write a line or two of poetry yourself. Or you might discover a discover something special! I liked this one by the 17thcentury poet Duchess of Newcastle Margaret Cavendish, “An Apology for Her Poetry.” It ends with the lines:

“Consider, pray, gold hath no life therein.”

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

February’s Book Displays

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Our first display on the main floor is a gift for book lovers, “Best Sellers You Might Have Missed”. It includes a large selection by the most popular authors, including John Grisham, Clive Cussler, Bernard Cornwell, Anne Rice, John Le Carre, Debbie Macomber, Fern Michaels, Jodi Picoult, Danielle Steel, Joyce Carol Oates and more.

“Books about American Activism” is the theme for our second display. It covers American history as the great experiment to begin the world anew.  Learn about the Civil Rights Movement for racial equality, the Women’s Rights from suffragettes to Roe V. Wade, the Gay Revolution and the history of U.S. Labor Movement. 

The 2 mini book displays are “British Library Crime Classics” and “2017 Edgar Award Nominees.  Check out these displays for some fun mystery reads.

On the third floor our health librarian’s display is “Affairs of the Heart-February is American Heart Month”.  Read about your heart, how it works, how to keep it healthy, how to talk to your cardiologist, what to eat and more. If a book is too time consuming, take home some of the informative handouts on the warning signs of a heart attack and how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Hope that this display will provide you with useful guides to staying heart-healthy.

“After the Inauguration-Presidents in Offices” is our second display on the third floor.  The books covers the White House and its residents thru the ages. Find out about past president’s governing styles, their religious beliefs, the staffing of the White House, and the role of the First Ladies. See how history has judged our past leaders.

Once again the staff of SPL offers some suggestions for your reading pleasure.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Veterans Day…Honoring All Those Who Served

veterans-day

 

Veterans Day (November 11th) honors individuals who served in the United States Armed Forces. It marks the anniversary of the end of World War I.  The major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. The United States previously observed Armistice Day. The U.S. holiday was renamed Veterans Day in 1954.

Here is a list of fiction books that explore different aspects of war that your book club may wish to discuss:

Perfume River by Robert Olen Butler

Presents the story of a single North Florida family shaped and overshadowed by the Vietnam War and the estrangements between the fathers, sons, and brothers who supported or protested against it.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

A blind French girl on the run from the German occupation and a German orphan-turned-Resistance tracker struggle with respective beliefs after meeting on the Brittany coast.

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain

Asked to be part of the Dallas Cowboys’ halftime show on Thanksgiving, Specialist Billy Lynn, one of the eight surviving men of the Bravo Squad, finds his life forever changed by this event that causes him to better understand difficult truths about himself.

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

A tragic wartime romance set against the brutal and chaotic backdrop of World War I is the classic story of a volunteer ambulance driver wounded on the Italian front and the English nurse he loves and leaves behind

Hurricane Street by Ron Kovic

In the spring of 1974, as the last American troops were being pulled out of Vietnam, Ron Kovic and a crew of other severely injured veterans in a California VA hospital launched the American Veterans Movement. … Kovic corralled his fellow AVM members into staging a sit-in, and then a hunger strike, in the Los Angeles office of senator Alan Cranston, demanding better treatment of injured and disabled veterans.

We Come to Our Senses: Stories by Odie Lindsey

Exploring the lives of veterans returning to their homes in the South, an intense debut centers around men and women affected by combat directly and tangentially, including a vet turned office clerk whose petty neuroses derail even her suicide and a woman who redeploys to her Mississippi hometown and confronts the superior who abused her at war.

Casualties by Elizabeth Marro

Shattered by her Iraq war vet son’s suicide, Ruth, an executive for a successful military defense contractor, flees her regrets during an east-bound road trip that forces her to confront her past, her choices, the war and her relationship with her son.

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

Heroic young men carry the emotional weight of their lives to war in Vietnam in a patchwork account of a modern journey into the heart of darkness.

The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers

In the midst of a bloody battle in the Iraq War, two soldiers, bound together since basic training, do everything to protect each other from both outside enemies and the internal struggles that come from constant danger.

The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli

Helen Adams, an American combat photographer during the Vietnam War, captures the wrenching chaos of battle on film and finds herself torn between the love of two men, one an American war correspondent and the other his Vietnamese underling.

 (All summaries from the publishers.)

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This article also appears in Syosset Public Library’s Book Club Insider newsletter for November 2016.

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services