Tag Archives: reading

Afternoon Book Discussion

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

at 1:30 PM

With Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services

When Ben Solomon accuses Elliot Rosenzweig, a respected civic leader and wealthy philanthropist, of being a former Nazi SS officer named Otto Piatek, two lives, two worlds, and sixty years converge in a race to redemption.

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

All are welcome!

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

April is National Poetry Month…

Do you like poetry? Come up to the Library’s third floor to sample a new poem. We have a bucket filled with copies of poetry for you to enjoy.

Can’t visit the library in person? May I suggest visiting the Library of Congress online? The venerable LC has so many hidden treasures. This month I suggest looking at Poetry 180.

This project by former Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a selection of poems for each day in the school year. Its target audience is high school students but it is open to everyone. It is a great way to discover new poets and their works:  “The Bagel” made me smile; every parent can identify with “To a Daughter Leaving Home.”

Poems are wonderful to read but they are even better when you hear them. So check out the LC’s Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature. This amazing source has audio recordings of many famous poets as well as lectures about poetry. There is an interview with Robert Frost (1959) which includes him reading some of his work. And Archibald MacLeish reads and comments on his poetry in 1963. You also can hear Margaret Atwood, Alan Dugan (I just discovered his “On the Long Island Railroad System”), Joyce Carol Oates, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Pinsky and Gwendolyn Brooks.

The Poetry Foundation  is another great resource. You can listen to the works by such people as Dylan Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar, John Dunne,Gerard Manley Hopkins and Robert Frost   You can search the Foundation’s collection of poems. They have a section of poems under 25 lines  and another section of poems by literary forms and terms.

Glance at any of these sites and you just might be inspired to write a line or two of poetry yourself. Or you might discover a discover something special! I liked this one by the 17thcentury poet Duchess of Newcastle Margaret Cavendish, “An Apology for Her Poetry.” It ends with the lines:

“Consider, pray, gold hath no life therein.”

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Evening Book Discussion

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

at 7:30 PM

with Sonia Grgas, Reference Librarian

This program is part of

“Music Is In the Air This Spring @ the Library”

The National Book Award–winning author of The Echo Maker delivers his most emotionally charged novel to date, inspired by the myth of Orpheus.

 Composer Peter Els opens the door one evening to find the police on his doorstep. His home microbiology lab—the latest experiment in his lifelong attempt to find music in surprising patterns—has aroused the suspicions of Homeland Security. Panicked by the raid, Els turns fugitive. As an Internet-fueled hysteria erupts, Els—the “Bioterrorist Bach”—pays a final visit to the people he loves, those who shaped his musical journey. Through the help of his ex-wife, his daughter, and his longtime collaborator, Els hatches a plan to turn this disastrous collision with the security state into a work of art that will reawaken its audience to the sounds  all around them.

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the circulation desk.

All are welcome!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

Evening Book Discussion Rescheduled

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

(new date)

    7:30 PM

with Evelyn Hershkowitz, Readers’ Services Librarian

Electing to marry the fiancé who is hospitalized for depression, a woman commits to decades of love and faith involving their brilliant musical eldest son, their responsible daughter and a tightly controlled younger son who helps her care for her increasingly troubled husband.

By the Pulitzer Prize-finalist author of You Are Not a Stranger Here.

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

-posted by Evelyn, Readers’ Services

Evening Book Discussion

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

    7:30 PM

with Evelyn Hershkowitz, Readers’ Services Librarian

Electing to marry the fiancé who is hospitalized for depression, a woman commits to decades of love and faith involving their brilliant musical eldest son, their responsible daughter and a tightly controlled younger son who helps her care for her increasingly troubled husband.

By the Pulitzer Prize-finalist author of You Are Not a Stranger Here.

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

-posted by Evelyn, Readers’ Services

Best Picture Oscar Nominees Based on Books

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will be giving out Oscars this Sunday, February 26, 2017, honoring films that were released in 2016.  Many of the nominated films were based on books.  Of the nine films nominated for Best Picture, four were based on books:

arrivalArrival

Adapted from: Ted Chiang’s 1998 short story “The Story of Your Life” from the collection Stories of Your Life and Others.

 

fencesFences

Adapted from: August Wilson’s 1983 play, Fences.

 

 

hidden-figuresHidden Figures

Adapted from:  Margot Lee Shetterly’s 2016 nonfiction book, Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race

 

4b733a61d604f585553b71682fe87c7bLion

Adapted from: A Long Way from Home: a Memoir by Saroo Brierley

 

 

The following film is nominated for Best Foreign Picture:

A Man Called Ove

Adapted from: Fredrik Backman’s novel, A a-man-called-oveMan Called Ove.

 

 

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Afternoon Book Discussion

us

Us  

by David Nicholls

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

1:30 PM

With Lisa Jones, Readers’ Services Librarian

Us is the story of Douglas, a husband and father whose life turns upside-down when his wife of three decades tells him she wants a divorce. Will a long-planned family trip to Europe give him one last chance to rescue his relationship with the woman he loves, and learn how to get closer to a son who’s always felt like a stranger?

This program is free.

No registration required.

          Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services