Tag Archives: nonfiction

Title Swap with Librarians

Second floor fireplace and seating area.

Please join us on Tuesday, June 6 at 1:30 PM

Share tea, coffee and cookies, as well as your favorite titles with the Readers’ Services staff of the Syosset Public Library.  Join librarians Jackie Ranaldo, Stacey Levine, Jean Simpson, Lisa Jones, Ralph Guiteau and Evelyn Hershkowitz for a fun hour of sharing the titles of our favorite books.

Looking for something particular?  Suspense?  Biography? Adventure?  Your next Book Club pick?  Ask the group … we promise you’ll leave with a great Summer reading list.  Not able to make the program?  No worries.  A list of the discussed titles will be left at each public service desk.  They will also be made available on our website.  We will be meeting on the 2nd floor right in front of our fireplace.

We look forward to seeing you there!

This program is free and no registration is required.

Can’t wait until then for a recommendation? Check out our past titles here.

– posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

Our Book Displays for May

Our main floor displays, this month, are “Mysteries in May” and “Awesome Autobiographies”.

“Mysteries in May” is a great collection of mystery and suspense novels by popular authors, such as Harlan Coben, Patricia Cornwell, Janet Evanovich, Laurie R. King, Stuart Woods, Linda Fairstein, Lee Child and more. Find your next thriller read in this display.

“Awesome Autobiographies” includes the stories of famous celebrities, sports persons, politicians and heroes.  You can read about Phil Collins, Goldie, Amy Schumer, Mindy Kaling or Tina Fey. Learn how people, such as Nelson Mandela, Coretta Scott King, Elie Wiesel and Malala Yousafzai, overcame the odds.

The two main floor mini displays* are “Star Wars, May the Fourth Be with You” and “International Holocaust Remembrance Day”.

 

On the third floor our health librarian’s display is “May is Mental Health Month”.  The display contains books on anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression and bipolar disorder, panic, post-traumatic stress disorder and borderline personality disorder.  The handouts include a fact sheet from NAMI on Mental Illness.  The other handouts cover the topics of risky behavior, Internet addiction, compulsive buying and prescription drug misuse.

The second display on the third floor is “Faraway Places Are Calling Me”.  Dreaming of an exotic vacation?  Check out some of these books for ideas.  They are not about  your typical tourist spots, but rather are for the daring who are looking for some real excitement and thrills.

Enjoy the beautiful spring weather with some entertaining books.

*Mini displays may be subject to change during the month.

-posted by Betty, Reference Librarian

Evening Book Discussion

When Breath Becomes Air

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at 7:30 PM

With Ralph Guiteau, Readers’ Services Librarian

“What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions the author Paul Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir.”

-from the publisher.

The program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

-posted br Ralph, Readers’ Services

February’s Book Displays

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Our first display on the main floor is a gift for book lovers, “Best Sellers You Might Have Missed”. It includes a large selection by the most popular authors, including John Grisham, Clive Cussler, Bernard Cornwell, Anne Rice, John Le Carre, Debbie Macomber, Fern Michaels, Jodi Picoult, Danielle Steel, Joyce Carol Oates and more.

“Books about American Activism” is the theme for our second display. It covers American history as the great experiment to begin the world anew.  Learn about the Civil Rights Movement for racial equality, the Women’s Rights from suffragettes to Roe V. Wade, the Gay Revolution and the history of U.S. Labor Movement. 

The 2 mini book displays are “British Library Crime Classics” and “2017 Edgar Award Nominees.  Check out these displays for some fun mystery reads.

On the third floor our health librarian’s display is “Affairs of the Heart-February is American Heart Month”.  Read about your heart, how it works, how to keep it healthy, how to talk to your cardiologist, what to eat and more. If a book is too time consuming, take home some of the informative handouts on the warning signs of a heart attack and how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Hope that this display will provide you with useful guides to staying heart-healthy.

“After the Inauguration-Presidents in Offices” is our second display on the third floor.  The books covers the White House and its residents thru the ages. Find out about past president’s governing styles, their religious beliefs, the staffing of the White House, and the role of the First Ladies. See how history has judged our past leaders.

Once again the staff of SPL offers some suggestions for your reading pleasure.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Happy New Year: Our January Displays

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Our book displays this month celebrate the New Year.  The first display on the first floor is “Best Books of 2016”.  It includes both fiction and non-fiction. The titles were selected from newspaper’s best seller lists, various publisher’s starred lists and librarians’ favorites.  Browse the selection to see what catches you eye and have a good read on a long winter’s night.

The second display is “January is International Creativity Month”. What better time to learn a new skill or take up a new hobby, than the start of a new year? If you’re in the mood to improve your creative skills try one of our suggestions.

The two mini displays are “Best Sellers of 2016” and “Best Books of 2007”.  So you have more suggested books to read with “best of” in their description.

Our third floor displays are “New Year New You” and “Use Laughter to Warm Up This Winter”:

Once again our health librarian has selected books to help us learn the best ways to stay healthy. Tips for healthy eating and dieting, instructions for physical fitness and exercise, and mindfulness training for relaxing and getting rid of stress.  As always handouts are part of this display.   I’m going to try the “31-Day Push-Up Challenge”.

Last but not least is “Use Laughter to Warm Up This Winter”.  Lots of books on classic comedy of the Honeymooners, Seinfeld, Flip, Monty Python, Amos and Andy, SNL, Stephen Colbert and the Keystone Cops and more.

So, Happy New Year, and celebrate with a best book, a new creative skill, healthy life style or just a good laugh.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books of 2016 (Pt. 7, the last)

booksIn what has become a tradition here at Syosset R and R, we will be running a series of blog posts throughout the month of December telling you about our staff’s favorite reads for this year.  The books mentioned were read during 2016 but not necessarily published in 2016. Here’s the seventh and last installment:

Meghan, Reference Librarian:

Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland

life-in-motioProfiles the life and career of the professional ballerina, covering from when she began dance classes at age thirteen in an after-school community center through becoming the only African American soloist dancing with the American Ballet Theatre.

Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

voyagerContinues the story of Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser that began with the now-classic novel Outlander and continued in Dragonfly in Amber, sweeping us from the battlefields of eighteenth-century Scotland to the exotic West Indies.

The House at Riverton By Kate Morton

house-at-rivertonLiving out her final days in a nursing home, ninety-eight-year-old Grace remembers the secrets surrounding the 1924 suicide of a young poet during a glittering society party hosted by Grace’s English aristocrat employers, a family that is shattered by war.

Sue Ann, Head of Children’s Services:

man-called-oveA Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

A curmudgeon hides a terrible personal loss beneath a cranky and short-tempered exterior while clashing with new neighbors, a boisterous family whose chattiness and habits lead to unexpected friendship.

Audrey, Media Services Clerk:

News of the World by Paulette Jiles

news-of-the-worldIn the aftermath of the Civil War, Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, an elderly widower and itinerant news reader, is offered fifty dollars to bring an orphan girl, who was kidnapped and raised by Kiowa raiders, from Wichita Falls back to her family in San Antonio.

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler

sweetbitterA year in the life of a beguiling young woman in the wild world of a famous downtown New York restaurant follows her burning effort to become someone of importance through a backwaiter job that enables her indulgences in culinary and intellectual interests.

moonglowMoonglow by Michael Chabon

A man bears witness to his grandfather’s deathbed confessions, which reveal his family’s long-buried history and his involvement in a mail-order novelty company, World War II, and the space program.

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

dragonfly-in-amberIn the sequel to Outlander,  Claire Randall and her daughter, Brianna, return to the majestic hills of Scotland, where Claire recalls the love of her life–gallant warrior James Fraser.

“I re-read this while watching the Outlander television series’ second season and it was better than the first time.”

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

career-of-evilWhen a woman’s severed leg is delivered to Robin Ellacott, her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, has to look into his past to determine who is responsible.

“This is the third installment of J. K. Rowling’s detective mystery series that she’s writing under a pseudonym, and I am finding them very enjoyable.”

Am I Alone Here? Notes on Living to Read and Reading to Live by Peter Orner

am-i-alone-hereA collection of 41 short essays about reading and life reflects the acclaimed writer’s beliefs about the role of stories in shaping his identity.

” I’m a big fan of books about books and reading and read several this year.  I enjoyed this one the most. The problem with this type of book is that you always end up with a list of other books you’ll want to read.”

(All plot summaries from the publishers.)

Please tell us in the comments what your favorite 2016 reads were.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books of 2016 (Pt. 6)

booksIn what has become a tradition here at Syosset R and R, we will be running a series of blog posts throughout the month of December telling you about our staff’s favorite reads for this year.  The books mentioned were read during 2016 but not necessarily published in 2016. Here’s the sixth installment:

Lisa H., Reference Services Librarian:

nightingaleThe Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

Reunited when the elder’s husband is sent to fight in World War II, French sisters Vianne and Isabelle find their bond as well as their respective beliefs tested by a world that changes in horrific ways

“I felt every emotion while reading this book. A good historical fiction pick.”

famous-nathanFamous Nathan: A Family Saga of Coney Island, the American Dream, and the Search for the Perfect Hot Dog by Lloyd Handwerker

Traces the rise of Nathan’s Famous from a small Coney Island concession on an undeveloped boardwalk to an international brand, tracing founder Nathan Handwerker’s flight from World War I-stricken Europe and his menial jobs in 1912 New York before building an empire that has become the object of a heated legal dispute.

“Nathan really did live the American dream after arriving in New York City.”

girlsThe Girls by Emma Cline

Mesmerized by a band of girls in the park she perceives as enjoying a life of free and careless abandon, 1960s teen Evie Boyd becomes obsessed with gaining acceptance into their circle, only to find herself drawn into a cult and seduced by its charismatic leader.

“Could not put this one down. Based on the Manson murders, Evie is looking for love in all the wrong places.”

Bonnie, Circulation Clerk:

velvet-hoursThe Velvet Hours by Alyson Richman

In the face of the German Occupation, Solange leaves her late grandmother’s treasure-filled Paris apartment, unsure if she’ll ever return, but as she sets out on a new path, her grandmother’s legacy of cultivating a life of art and beauty guides her.

“I really enjoyed The Velvet Hours. It was very different for the usual Historical Fiction.”

twelve-days-of-christmasTwelve Days of Christmas by Debbie Macomber

Follows the experiences of an aspiring journalist who starts a blog to seek revenge against a handsome but arrogant neighbor who she treats with exceeding kindness in the hopes of breaking through his cold exterior.

“Debbie Macomber’s holiday book was a very entertaining and enjoyable read.”

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian:

behold-the-dreamersBehold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

An immigrant working class couple from Cameroon and the upper class American family for whom they work find their lives and marriages shaped by financial circumstances, infidelities, secrets, and the 2008 recession.

“This was my favorite book this year and would make for an excellent book discussion.”

nixThe Nix by Nathan Hill

Astonished to see the mother who abandoned him in childhood throwing rocks at a presidential candidate, a bored college professor struggles to reconcile the media depictions of his mother with his memories and decides to draw her out by penning a tell-all biography.

 “An exceptional debut novel”

when-breath-becomes-airWhen Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi 

A Ivy League-trained, award-winning young neurosurgeon describes his how after receiving a terminal diagnosis with lung cancer he explored the dynamics of his roles as a patient and care provider, the philosophical conundrums about a meaningful life and how he wanted to spend his final days.

“This was my favorite non-fiction title of the year.”

(All plot summaries from the publishers.)

Tell us in the comments what your favorite 2016 reads were and check in with Syosset R and R for more of “Our Favorite Reads of 2016” next week when we wind up the series!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services