Tag Archives: nonfiction

5 Years on the Blog – December

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in December in the past five years, which are all about our staff’s reading during those years:

2016: Our Favorite Books of 2016 (Part 6)

2015: Our Favorite Books of 2015

2014: Our Favorite Books of 2014

2013: About Our Reading -2013 #1

2012: Questions about Books: 2012, Part 1

We’ll take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in January.  Happy New Year to all!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

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Our Favorite Reads – 2017 (Part II)

In today’s post we continue to look back at our reading during 2017 and sharing the books that were some of our favorites for the year.

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas Evelyn

After witnessing her friend’s death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter’s life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.

 

Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services:

In the Sea There Are Crocodiles by Fabio Geda 

In a fictional retelling of a true story, ten-year-old Enaiat leaves his small Afghanistan village after the Taliban takes over in 2000, and when his mother is forced to leave him in Pakistan, he endures a five-year ordeal to make his way to Italy.

 

Brenda, Reference Services Librarian:

Dead Wake by Eric Larson 

A chronicle of the sinking of the Lusitania discusses the factors that led to the tragedy and the contributions of such figures as Woodrow Wilson, bookseller Charles Lauriat, and architect Theodate Pope Riddle.

 

Lisa H., Reference Services Librarian:

Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan

After moving to America, a shy and responsible older sister and a gregarious young sister who thrives in their new Boston home endure the long-term repercussions of a fateful decision when the younger sister becomes pregnant.

 

Megan, Systems Manager:

Generation V by M. L. Brennan

Fortitude Scott?s life is a mess. A degree in film theory has left him with zero marketable skills, his job revolves around pouring coffee, his roommate hasn?t paid rent in four months, and he?s also a vampire. Well, sort of. He?s still mostly human. But when a new vampire comes into his family?s territory and young girls start going missing, Fort can?t ignore his heritage anymore.

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Peace Like a River by Leif Enger

Young Reuben Land has little doubt that miracles happen all around us, suspecting that his own father is touched by God. When his older brother flees a controversial murder charge, Reuben, along with his older sister and father, set off on a journey that will take them to the Badlands and through a landscape more extraordinary than they could have anticipated.

Meghan, Reference Services Librarian:

Eliza and her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

When the anonymous teen creator of a wildly popular webcomic is tempted by a school newcomer to pursue real-world relationships, everything she has worked so hard to build crumbles in the wake of their highly publicized romance.

Jean S.. Readers’ Services Librarian:

Sing, Unburied, Sing ​by Jesmyn Ward 

Living with his grandparents and toddler sister on a Gulf Coast farm, Jojo navigates the challenges of his tormented mother’s addictions and his grandmother’s terminal cancer before the release of his father from prison prompts a road trip of danger and hope.

If you would like to see some of our favorites of 2016, you can look here and here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books – 2017 (Part I)

In today’s post we are looking back at our reading during 2017 and sharing the books that were some of our favorites for the year.

Pam M., Assistant Library Director:

The Nix by Nathan Hill

Astonished to see the mother who abandoned him in childhood throwing rocks at a presidential candidate, a bored college professor struggles to reconcile the media depictions of his mother with his memories and decides to draw her out by penning a tell-all biography.

 

Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore

When electric light innovator Thomas Edison sues his only remaining rival for patent infringement, George Westinghouse hires untested Columbia Law School graduate Paul Ravath for a case fraught with lies, betrayals, and deception.

 

Jessikah, Children’s Services Librarian:

Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

Having heard tales of the beautiful but dangerous Goblin King all her life, Liesl infuses her musical compositions with her romantic dreams before the abduction of her sister forces her to journey to the Underground, where she faces an impossible choice.

 

Amy, Children’s Services Librarian:

Fever by Mary Beth Keane 

A story inspired by the life of the woman known as “Typhoid Mary” traces the efforts of a headstrong Irish immigrant whose tenacity and talent for cooking gains her entry into upper-class kitchens until the discovery of her status as a disease carrier forces her into an isolation that she eventually defies with horrific results.

 

Sue Ann, Head of Children’s Services:

Will’s Red Coat by Tom Ryan

The best-selling author of Following Atticus traces the author’s adoption of a traumatized, hearing-impaired elderly dog who throughout his remaining years transformed from a hostile and violent canine to a happy, puppy-like companion

 

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian:

Beartown by Fredrik Backman 

In the tiny forest community of Beartown, the possibility that the amateur hockey team might win a junior championship, bringing the hope of revitalization to the fading town, is shattered by the aftermath of a violent act that leaves a young girl traumatized.

(All summaries from the publishers.)

We will be sharing another batch of favorites in a day or two, so stay tuned.  If you would like to see some of our favorites of 2016, you can look here and here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

Our Book Displays for November

Our first main floor display is “Down But Not Out”, a collection of former best sellers and classics. It includes books by authors such as Joyce Carol Oates, Lewis Carroll, John Irving, Bernard Cornwell and Jamaica Kincaid.  Check out this display for a great read.

In honor of Veterans Day our second display is “Patriot’s Game.” It’s a tribute to our military heroes and includes stories of various wars and battles that brave men and women, both officers and soldiers, fought. The display aims at giving a sense of history from the late 1700s until the present day of the U.S. military. Many biographies are also included.

Our two mini book displays are the “2017 National Book Awards” which celebrates great literature and the prolific author Patricia Highsmith. Some of her books have been made into movies including The Talented Mr. Ripley, Carol, and Strangers on the Train . These are also to be found on the main floor.

On the third floor our health reference display is “National Diabetes Awareness.” Learn how to manage this common disease.  Information on weight loss plans, exercise options, insulin pumps and glucose monitoring devices can be found here. Both books and handouts are available.

Yes, it’s November and time to vote. “Gaining the Right to Vote. Exercising that Right” is our second third floor display.  Read about the long trail to equal access to the ballot – an interesting topic still hot in the news.

Of course our displays aren’t just books but include audio books and DVDs.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

*Displays are subject to change during the month*

National Native American Heritage Month

President Trump has issued a proclamation setting November as National Native American Heritage Month. In this he follows in the tradition begun in 1976 when Congress authorized President Ford to proclaim a week honoring Native Americans.

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The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of the American Indian has some fascinating online exhibits.  Take a look at the exhibit on the treaties between the nations and the U.S. government. The Museum also has an online exhibit, “Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our Nation’s Armed Forces,” which spotlights Native Americans’ participation in the military from the Revolutionary War to today (when they are today serving at a higher rate in proportion to their population than any other ethnic group). Since we celebrate Veterans day as well this month, consider the World War II role of Code Talkers , those who used native languages to communicate securely during World War II. Some of the collections of the American Museum of Natural History are available online: take a look at the amazing work of the Northwest Coast Indians to see beautiful basketry, carving and textiles.

Maybe you want to plan a trip to visit these museums! Or travel to Pueblo Acoma, the oldest continuously occupied community in the United States situated atop a 367-foot bluff between Albuquerque and Gallup, New Mexico. Or check out the archaeological and architectural wonders of Chaco Canyon (founded around 850 AD) or the impressive cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde Closer to home is Fort Stanwix , which was built on traditional Oneida land.

Locally, the Garvies Point Museum in Glen Cove will be hosting a Native American Feast  on November 18-19 which will feature pottery making and dugout canoe building in addition to cooking displays and samples.

Acoma Pueblo (Bob Ayre)

The Syosset Library has many books about contemporary art (try Native American Painters of the 20th Century or North American Indian Art), philosophy (Wisdom of the Native Americans or Standing in the Light: A Lakota Way of Seeing), history (American Nations, or In the Hands of the Great Spirit). Jack Weatherford’s Indian Givers and Native Roots look at contributions to United States history and culture. There are many more books about art, culture, folklore, history as well as biographies.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Our October Book Displays

October, It’s a Spooky Time of Year,

…and this is the theme for one of our first floor book displays. There are plenty of books on how to celebrate Halloween. Get ideas for costumes, parties, recipes, crafts and decorations. The display also includes lots spooky reads, both fiction and nonfiction. Fiction books by Stephen King, Edgar Allen Poe and Bram Stokes are some of classics in this display. Also included in the display are nonfiction titles on haunted houses and paranormal happenings.  October and Halloween, it’s a fun time of year and a good time for a silly or not so silly ghost story.

The second display is Way Back Machine-Nonfiction Best Sellers of the Past.  As the title suggests,  reading can be like a time travel adventure.  This display includes titles from history such as Six Wives of Henry VIII by Alison Weir, The Wars of the Roses by Dan Jones  and The Witches: Salem 1692 by Stacy Schiff,  to those about more contemporary times,  such as Leadership by Rudolph W. Giuliani and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson . It’s not only about history but includes titles on psychology, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus by John Gray and The Art of Happiness by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Howard Cutter, M.D.   Many more topics, such as art and music, are included in this impressive collection of best sellers.

Currently our two mini displays are Vince Flynn, a prolific American author of political thriller novels and Kazuo Ishiguro, the 2017 Nobel Prize Winner for literature.

 

On the third floor the health book display is October Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Learn the signs and symptoms of this disease, and how to cope with a diagnosis.  As usual, the display contains many informative handouts.

Winners is the theme for the second display on the third floor.  The winners are from all categories such as the Oscars, the Olympics, the Grammys, Medal of Freedom, World Series, Nobel Prize and more. Learn about the various fields of expertise and the individuals who excel and win.

Wishing you an informative and entertaining read.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Afternoon Book Discussion

with Sonia Grgas, Reference Librarian

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 1:30 PM

Vance, a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, provides an account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, and poverty characteristic of their part of America. -(summary from the publisher)

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the circulation desk .

 

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services