Tag Archives: history

September’s Book Displays

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As the new school year starts, Syosset Public Library is hosting our second biennial Sy-Con. In conjunction with this event, we have two book displays on the first floor, both with the same theme – Escape Reality: Enter the World of Science Fiction and Fantasy. A bonanza find of books and dvds for fans of this genre.  And it’s also a great introduction to sci-fi and fantasy for anyone interested. Sy-Con 2019 will be held at our library Friday, September 13, 6:30-8:30 pm and Saturday, September 14, 9:00 am-4:30 pm. For more information go to www.sycon.org. Don’t miss either this big event or our book displays.

The theme for the 2 mini displays* are:

On This Friday the 13th Read a Chilling Horror Novel

In Memoriam, Dorothea Benton Frank, (Sept. 12, 1951-Sept. 2, 2019), a bestselling American novelist.

*mini-displays are subject to change*

The health display on the third floor is September 1-30, Pain Awareness Month.  Pain, whether acute or chronic, is something all people deal with at some point in their lives. Learn what causes pain and what can be done to deal with pain. Included in this display is the classic Mind Over Back Pain by John Sarno, M.D. and books on gout, arthritis, neck pain, and pain management.  There are a variety of handouts on non-drug pain relief, prescription opioids and other pain management related topics. A very timely and important display.




Constitution Day  is the next display, and is a federal observance that commemorates the U.S. Constitution, which was signed on September 17, 1787. Some interesting facts about the Constitution are it originally contains 4,543 words and has been amended 27 times. For more information on the formation and application of our nation’s basic governing document, check out this display.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Constitution and Citizenship Day

September 17 is celebrated as Constitution and Citizenship Day commemorating the day in 1787 that the United States Constitution was signed and recognizing all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.

For four months in the summer of 1787 twelve states (Rhode Island did not attend) sent 55 men to meet in secret session in Philadelphia to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead they created a new Constitution with a stronger central government.

(1)  Which of the founding Fathers did not attend the Constitutional Convention: George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, or Thomas Jefferson?  

(2) Who is known as the “Father of the Constitution”?

(3) Which state was the ninth state (2/3 of the states then in the Union) to ratify the new constitution and when did that happen?

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The answers are (1) Thomas Jefferson was not in Philadelphia for the convention because he was serving as Minister to France (2) James Madison was called that because of his contributions as a political theorist and practical politician.  He took meticulous notes about the proceedings and, after the document was signed, he along with John Jay and Alexander Hamilton wrote the Federalist Papers campaigning for the its ratification. (3) New Hampshire signed the document on June 21, 1788 making the Constitution the law of the land.

Not everyone approved the scrapping of the Articles of Confederation or of the stronger federal government that was created. Some agreed to ratify the Constitution in the expectation that there would be some amendments limiting the federal power and safeguarding individual liberty. By December 15, 1791 there were 10 Amendments signed. They are known as the Bill of Rights.

There is a display of books on the third floor about the history of the Constitution and about the process of becoming a citizen. Curious about the framing of the Constitution but can’t get to the library? The National Archives provides an excellent history and analysis here.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

June’s Book Displays

It’s that time of year, Time to Grab a Great Book and Head to the Beach, one of the main floor’s book displays for June – lots of fun reads for your extra leisure time. Pick up the flyer Fun in the Sun, a bibliography of new beach reads, here. Now is the time to register for the 2019 Adult Summer Reading Club and club events.

Our second main floor display is LGBT Pride Month- 50th Anniversary of Stonewall,  dedicated to books on gay, lesbian and transgender related topics. Some of the subjects covered in this display are the history for equal rights, guides for parents and family members, and issues for today’s LGBT youth.

 

Our 2 mini displays are:

· June is Audiobook Month – a selection of audiobooks.

· Become a Grill Master – have some barbeque parties and fun with these how-to books.

On the third floor, our displays are

Health Beach Reads, the theme for the June health display. I love to read for entertainment but it is also great to read for education. Learn more about health issues that affect you and your loved ones. What could be more useful? Lots of handouts included with this display.

The next book display is 75th Anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1944 – all about the day allied forces invaded France to liberate Europe from the Nazi’s control, and one of the most important days of American and World history that we all should know about. It’s a tale of tens of thousands of heroes, and heroic deeds.

Syosset Public Library is your place for enjoyment and learning!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

D-Day: 75 Years Ago Today

D-Day: On June 6, 1944 the Allies launched Operation Overlord. This was the largest amphibious invasion in history. It began with the landing overnight of 18,000 British and American parachutists in occupied France. There were 4,000 ships, 11,000 warplanes, and 156,000 Allied troops involved. They landed on the Normandy beaches: the British and Canadians at Gold, Juno and Sword and the Americans at Utah and Omaha. The accepted number of Allied deaths on that day is 4,414.

Allies faced the German Atlantic Wall, a system of fortifications, obstacles and mines in the water and along the shore. But the Germans could not guard every place along the coast. They had troops in the East fighting the Russians and in Italy fighting the Allied troops. They had to guess where the Allies would land. They guessed wrong. For months there had been an elaborate campaign of disinformation and deception including dropping dummies, fake radio broadcasts, even an actor portraying Montgomery was “seen” in Algiers!

The library has a book display on the third floor commemorating D-Day. There are DVDs in our collection to borrow, such as The Longest Day or Overlord. From the comfort of home you can follow four veterans in a Library of Congress Story Map : Preston Earl Bagent, Army combat engineer; Robert “Bob: Harlan Horr, a glider pilot; Edward Duncan Cameron, a rifleman; and John William “Bill” Boehne, III, a sailor. Their stories make the momentous days very personal.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

5 Years of the Blog – April

Let’s take a look at some of Syosset Public Library’s blog posts in April during the past five years:

2018: APRIL’S ART DISPLAY

2017: WHAT WE’RE READING NOW- AUDIOBOOK EDITION

2016: BROADWAY MUSICALS AND PLAYS—BASED ON, INSPIRED BY, OR ADAPTED FROM BOOKS

2015: APRIL: A BUSY TIME FOR HISTORY BUFFS

2014: PUT A POEM IN YOUR POCKET TODAY

See you next month when we take a look at the past 5 years in May.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our March Displays

Award Winners is the subject of our first display on the main floor. It showcases winners of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the Man Booker Prize. You may have already read some of these books, but there are some great ones you might have missed.

 

March is Women’s History Month and the theme of our second main floor display. Read about the women’s movement and their struggle for their place in society, the right to vote and equal employment opportunities. The display includes biographies of famous women, such as Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Malala Yousafzai, Indira Gandhi, Rosa Parks, Condoleezza Rice, Sandra Day O’Connor, Gloria Steinem, Eleanor Roosevelt and others.

 

 

 

The subjects of our 2 mini displays* are:

The Art of the Novella- A selection of classic novellas from Melville House publishing.

Robert Goddard-  Books from the 2019 CWA Diamond Dagger Award winner, the highest honor in British crime writing.

*mini-displays are subject to change during the month

On the third floor, our health librarian’s display is National Nutrition Month. The display has books covering healthy eating topics, such as how to stay healthy, what foods to avoid for various illnesses, and nutritional guides for children. The display also includes lots of handouts on eating and snacking for wellness.

Dreams of Far Away Places, also a display on the third floor, is for those who suffer from wanderlust. Learn about some exotic travel destinations and get some ideas for a trip or a travel adventure, or you may just want to read and be entertained by other people’s tales of travel.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Commemorating the Centennial of the Death of Theodore Roosevelt Today

January 6, 1919. Theodore Roosevelt died around 4 a.m. at his beloved home, Sagamore Hill home. He had been a NYS Assemblyman, NYC Police Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Colonel of the Rough Riders, NY Governor and U.S. Vice President assuming the office of President when William McKinley was assassinated. And he won the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating peace after the Russo-Japanese War. These were his official roles. He was also a rancher, a hunter, a conservationist, and an author (more than 30 books and somewhere around 150,000 letters).

Hard to believe that he was only 60 when he died. He left a legacy of civic engagement, conservation and an active lifestyle.

The Bismarck (North Dakota) Tribune eulogized him on its front page: “In the passing of Theodore Roosevelt the world loses a man. No matter how widely opinions may differ as to his politics and his methods, there is universal appreciation of those sterling qualities of virile manhood …. The life of Theodore Roosevelt marks an epoch in the development of America. He lived earnestly and sincerely. …His memory will be cherished for his genuine Americanism, his unswerving loyalty and his devotion to the public weal.”

Some Theodore Roosevelt related activities:

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    Visit our first floor book display of his life and work.

  • Join the Syosset library for a book discussion of Mark Lee Gardner’s Rough Riders January 8 at 7:30 p.m.
  • On Thursday January 17 at 2 we will have a lecture on “Roosevelt’s Life and Legacy”.
  • Roosevelt’s Oyster Bay home, Sagamore Hill, is a short drive away.
  • A train ride away is the NYC American Museum of Natural History (of which his father was a founder) where he contributed many species of birds, mammals, and amphibians he had collected during a 1914 trip to the Brazilian jungles.
  • Or start planning a summer vacation to see his profile at Mount Rushmore and his Elkhorn cabin at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Be careful of the bison out there!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services