Tag Archives: history

5 Years on the Blog

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in May in the past five years:

2017:  STARTUP THAT BBQ!

2016: TOOLS TO FIND YOUR NEXT READ, PART 1

2015: GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING WORKSHOP

2014: HOW I SPENT THE MONTH OF APRIL…

2013: NEW TO BOOK CLUB IN A BAG

Watch out for when we take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in June.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

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Our April Book Displays

Get Cooking is the theme for our first book display.  What a great collection of cookbooks– cookbooks for healthy eating, diabetics, allergy-friendly, gluten-free, and weight-watchers. There are some great ethnic cookbooks for Italian cookery and the Kosher baker. There are cookbooks for the busy family, cooking for two, the picky eater, and comfort food. The collection even has The Can’t Cook Book: 100+ Recipes for the Absolutely Terrified by Jessica Seinfeld.

 

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., our second book display is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement.  The books cover the man, his dream, and his life. Included topics are the history of the Civil Rights Movement, the March on Washington, and the Freedom Walkers. Also in this display are biographies of Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, James Meredith and Stokely Carmichael.

 

Our 2 mini displays are Holocaust Remembrance Day – April 12, 2018 and In Remembrance – Anita Shreve , bestselling author.

 

Our displays on the third floor:

April is Autism Awareness Month and is the theme for the health display.  It includes books that offer practical guides to autism, understanding autism, and how to care for a child with autism. Also included are how to help autistic persons achieve their dreams and goals. Besides the books, there are lots of handouts.

Celebrate National Library Week April 8-14 is next display (something that is near and dear to me).  Some of the topics covered are the history of libraries from ancient times to the modern public library, how to do research at the library, the Library of Congress and the Dewey Decimal System.

Last but not least, in honor of April is National Poetry Month, is the blue bucket of Poems for your Pocket. Come and take a poem. The blue bucket is sitting at the reference desk on the third floor.

And remember April showers bring May flowers and Syosset Library brings great reads!

**Displays are subject to change during the month**

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

 

 

 

Evening Book Discussion

with Sonia Grgas, Reference Librarian

Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 7:30 PM

In Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Assassination

Named a Best Book of 2017 by NPR
The New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice
The Washington Post’s Books to Read in 2017
USA Today, “New and Noteworthy”
Read it Forward, Favorite Reads of January 2017
A Parade Magazine Pick

The wife of Martin Luther King Jr., founder of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change and singular 20th-century American civil rights activist presents her full life story, as told before her death to one of her closest confidants. -from the publisher

This program is free. No registration required.

Books are available at the circulation desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs

may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

A Museum Outing With Your Book Club

Now that winter is upon us, a trip to a museum or indoor garden may be just the thing to refresh your book club and beat those winter blues.   Below is a sampling of current museum exhibits that are part of SPL’s Museum Pass Program. 

Museum of the City of New York

King in New York – through June 1, 2018

Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King Jr., King in New York traces the civil rights leader’s encounters with New York from the 1950s until his assassination in 1968. The exhibition’s historic images chronicle King’s sermons in churches and speeches to the United Nations, his discussions about race relations with New York City’s mayor, and his relationships with New York’s own networks of activists.

Beyond Suffrage:  A Century of New York Women in Politics – through August 5, 2018

This exhibit traces women’s political activism in New York City from the struggle to win the vote, through the 20th century, and into our own times. Beginning with the long battle for women’s voting rights that culminated in 1917 statewide and 1920 nationally, the exhibition highlights women at the center of New York’s politics over the course of 100 years.

Nassau County Museum of Art

Fool the Eye – through March 4, 2018

Get ready to be amazed by an exhibition filled with optical illusions and artistic sleight of hand! Trompe l’oeil, hypnotic abstractions, perceptual illusions, mind-bending impossibilities and more. Artists include Salvador Dali, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Vik Muniz and many others.

The Jazz Age – March 17, 2018 – July 8, 2018

The Jazz Age is highlighted by masterpieces of the 1920s, neoclassical paintings by Picasso, the avant-garde breakthroughs of James Joyce and Coco Chanel and enduring classics such as Balanchine’s Apollo. The exhibition also features musical and literary programs, lectures and symposia exploring the art, design, music, dance and literature of this unforgettable era.

New York Historical Society

Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence – through March 11, 2018

Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence showcases hand-drawn and engraved maps from the 18th and early 19th centuries that illuminate the tremendous changes—geographic, political, and economic—that occurred before, during, and just after the Revolutionary War.

The Vietnam War: 1945 – 1975 – through April 22, 2018

The New-York Historical Society presents a groundbreaking exhibition on one of the most controversial events of the 20th century: the Vietnam War. Populating a 3,000-square-foot gallery with interpretive displays, digital media, artwork, artifacts, photographs, and documents, the exhibit provides an enlightening account of the causes, progression, and impact of the war.

If your group is interested in any of these exhibits, our Readers’ Services Librarians would be happy to pair it with just the right book to couple your visit with a book discussion.

Museum passes can be reserved up to 60 days in advance with an adult Syosset Public Library card in good standing. Most passes admit 2 adults and 2 children.  To reserve a museum pass or to view our Museum Pass Guidelines in full detail, visit www.syossetlibrary.org and click on the museum pass icon or call (516) 921-7161 ext. 239.

*Exhibit descriptions provided by the museums. 

*This article first appeared in the February 2018 issue of Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider.       

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services                                                                       

Happy birthday, Alexander Hamilton!

Born on January 11 on the British West Indies island of Nevis in either 1755 or 1757 Hamilton was left an orphan at a young age. He dreamed of military glory to help raise him from his impoverished state. He achieved his dream of success…even becoming the star of a major Broadway musical 200 years later!

Hamilton’s life was changed when he wrote a letter about a hurricane that stuck St. Croix in 1772. When the letter was published in a local newspaper, businessmen were so impressed they arranged for the young Hamilton to travel to the United States for education. And so his career began: aide to George Washington, Delegate to Continental Congress and to the Constitutional Convention, co-author of the Federalist Papers, Secretary of the Treasury and founder of the National Bank. He was killed by Aaron Burr in a duel in 1804.

Check out the books we own including  Ron Chernow’s biography, Alexander Hamilton (which is also available as an audiobook), Richard Morris’s Witnesses at the Creation: Hamilton, Madison, Jay, and the Constitution, and Thomas McCraw’s The Founder’s and Finance: How Hamilton, Gallatin, and Other Immigrants Forged a New Economy. And the classic, Miracle at Philadelphia: the Story of the Constitutional Convention, May to September, 1787. by Catherine Drinker Bowen tells the amazing story of the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

If you find your interest aroused the Library of Congress has a digital collection of Hamilton’s papers.  Among the family letters and his speeches and other writings one document stood out for me: his “Outline for a Plan of Government” he proposed at the Constitutional Convention. There is something amazing about seeing his ideas in his own handwriting!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

5 Years on the Blog

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in  November in the past five years:

2016: Veteran’s Day…Honoring All Those Who Served

2015: Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address

2014: What We’re Reading Now

2013: Next Book Club Pick: Why Not a Short Story Collection?

2012: Additional MOMA Pass!

Watch out for when we take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in December.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

National Native American Heritage Month

President Trump has issued a proclamation setting November as National Native American Heritage Month. In this he follows in the tradition begun in 1976 when Congress authorized President Ford to proclaim a week honoring Native Americans.

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The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of the American Indian has some fascinating online exhibits.  Take a look at the exhibit on the treaties between the nations and the U.S. government. The Museum also has an online exhibit, “Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our Nation’s Armed Forces,” which spotlights Native Americans’ participation in the military from the Revolutionary War to today (when they are today serving at a higher rate in proportion to their population than any other ethnic group). Since we celebrate Veterans day as well this month, consider the World War II role of Code Talkers , those who used native languages to communicate securely during World War II. Some of the collections of the American Museum of Natural History are available online: take a look at the amazing work of the Northwest Coast Indians to see beautiful basketry, carving and textiles.

Maybe you want to plan a trip to visit these museums! Or travel to Pueblo Acoma, the oldest continuously occupied community in the United States situated atop a 367-foot bluff between Albuquerque and Gallup, New Mexico. Or check out the archaeological and architectural wonders of Chaco Canyon (founded around 850 AD) or the impressive cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde Closer to home is Fort Stanwix , which was built on traditional Oneida land.

Locally, the Garvies Point Museum in Glen Cove will be hosting a Native American Feast  on November 18-19 which will feature pottery making and dugout canoe building in addition to cooking displays and samples.

Acoma Pueblo (Bob Ayre)

The Syosset Library has many books about contemporary art (try Native American Painters of the 20th Century or North American Indian Art), philosophy (Wisdom of the Native Americans or Standing in the Light: A Lakota Way of Seeing), history (American Nations, or In the Hands of the Great Spirit). Jack Weatherford’s Indian Givers and Native Roots look at contributions to United States history and culture. There are many more books about art, culture, folklore, history as well as biographies.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services