Tag Archives: history

November Book Displays

Don’t know what to read with so many great books in the library?  Try this month’s “Staff Picks” display. The display is a selection of favorites of the SPL staff. Our staff is made of avid readers so their picks will insure an enjoyable read. As usual, there is a lot to choose from.

The second display on the main floor is  “November – Memoir Month.” Truth can be stranger and more entertaining than fiction. Read someone’s life story. You can also listen to their stories on audio books. Some memoirs which have been made into movies are available on DVD for your viewing pleasure.

The two mini displays this month are:

* “The Great American Reads, The Top Fifteen Finalists”

* “Goodreads Awards, The Choice Awards for the Best Books of 2018”

*MIni-displays are subject to change during the month.

The third floor health librarian’s display is “November is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month”. The books here help explain the disease and how to cope with it for both the patient and caregivers. Also on the display are Fact Sheet handouts which include information on legal and financial planning for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

One more theme for November is “Native American Heritage Month”. Learn the history of the first people to inhabit the Americas, it is a story of diverse groups of people. Books include information on their culture, art, music, jewelry, and languages.

Hope our displays help you to make your reading choices easier and more varied. Enjoy!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

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November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

It is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse culture, traditions and histories, and to acknowledge the contributions, of Native Peoples.

The library has a display of books on the third floor. But if you can’t visit the library and want to expand your understanding of the First Peoples, there are many informative websites.

Check out a collaborative effort from the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, the National Park Service, and the Smithsonian and others paying tribute to the rich heritage of Native Americans. You can see a selection from these institutions from the comfort of your home. The online offerings span a wide range of topics from photographs by Edward Curtis to efforts to save the Cherokee language to the music of the Omaha and a selection from the National Gallery of ArtNative Languages  has compiled information about many aspects of Native culture. There is a list of internet resources for everything from biographies to technology and crafts and histories and you can  search by name of tribe for stories and legends too.

The website of the National Congress of the American Indian  has an online guide outlining the governance of tribes in the United States, Tribal Nations and the United States . You can also search for tribes by name or by location. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (with physical locations in DC and NYC) allows you to visit its exhibitions right from your computer. Fittingly, during this month when we celebrate Veterans’ Day, the museum has an online exhibit detailing the contributions of Native Americans who have fought in every war. Take a look at the valuable contributions of the Code Talkers during World War II.

And it’s not just history. Native culture is alive and well! Take a look at the current exhibit at the Museum of the American Indian’s New York space. Titled “Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound”, it joins traditional art with current media using light, digital projection and experimental media.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

October Book Displays

The theme for the first main floor display is It’s A Spooky Time of Year, containing books to get you in the Halloween spirit. Ideas for party planning, crafts, decorating, costumes, and trick-or-treating. The display also includes some good old fashioned ghost stories and tales of haunted houses.

Games People Play is the topic for the second display. Learn about the history, rules and people involved with various sports and games, such as baseball, basketball, golf, tennis, soccer, poker, and bowling.  The display includes both DVDs and books- a great collection for the sport enthusiast!

The themes for the two current* mini displays are:

The Great American Read (voted on by the American public) includes both lots of great reads and a bibliography of the great reads.

October 5th is James Bond Day – 007 is a collection of both books and movies about the fictional British spy.

*Mini displays are subject to change during the month.

 

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Currently on the third floor, the first display is Mental Health Awareness Week which is October 7-13.   You will  find books and handouts on all types of mental illness. The website for more information is http://www.MHAWEEK.org. For the rest of the month, this display will focus on October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

The next third floor display is October is Family History Month.  If you want to learn more about your genealogy, this display is for you. Besides the books to help locate resources and guides to using the resources, the reference librarians have created a useful handout, Resources for the Amateur Genealogist, a must-see for any budding genealogist!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

October is Family History Month: Do a Little Research

Thinking about your New York ancestors?

Although Ancestry.com is only available in the library or by paid subscription, several New York State  groups have formed a partnership with Ancestry to digitize records and make them available for free.  There is a helpful tutorial on the NYS archives page.

You will be asked to enter your zip code. Then you can start your search. Either type in a person’s name or scroll down to search a specific collection. Once you click on any document in your results, you will be prompted to create a free account by entering your name, email address and a password.

Be sure to choose “edit search” instead of “new search” while doing your research so that you don’t move into the subscription-only material.  Be careful and don’t click on any of the “suggested records” since that will take you to a page requiring you begin a paid subscription.

This is a terrific resource offering census, naturalization, birth, marriage, death, and military records. There are fascinating photos of NY Civil War soldiers through the Carte-de-visite collection.

You might even uncover some family skeletons in the records of inmates at Newgate State Prison!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

School days! Back to school days!

Heading back to school evokes mixed emotions. There is a certain excitement about a new school year with its new clothes, spotless notebooks and opportunity.

But no one wants the summer to end!

This poem was printed in the Richmond (Indiana)  Palladium and Sun-Telegram on September 9, 1916.

That feeling of the loss of summer’s freedom and the reluctance to go to back to the school routine hasn’t changed over the years.

Another thing that has remained the same is back to school shopping! Each year it seems that the back-to-school lists grows. Now there is Amazon which will deliver right to your door, but you used to go to the store to buy everything. Check out this ad (and the prices!) from the Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch in 1919.

posted by Brenda, Reference Services

5 Years on the Blog

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in during August in the past five years:

2017: WHAT WE’RE READING NOW

2016:  NEW IN DVD

2015: BOOK TO FILM DISCUSSION

2014: SUMMER HISTORY LESSON

2013:  READ THE BOOK…SEE THE MOVIE

Watch out for another nostalgic look at the past five years next month.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Discover Something New 102!

The National Park Service marks its 102 birthday on August 25. To celebrate it launched a campaign to “discover something new!”

Did you know that here on Long Island we have two NPS units? Fire Island National Seashore (pictured above) with its spectacular beaches and iconic light house as well as the historic Old Mastic House, home of the William Floyd, signer of the Declaration of Independence, is located on the South Shore. On the North Shore in Oyster Bay you can visit the home of the Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th U.S. President, Sagamore Hill.

If you have more time, consider a trip into NYC. You might think of visiting the famous Statue of Liberty, beacon of freedom, or Ellis Island where so many of our ancestors passed through. If you are downtown, take some time to see Federal Hall where George Washington took the oath of office as the first President or the African Burial Ground (pictured above), the nation’s earliest and largest African Burial Ground rediscovered in the United States, containing upwards of 15,000 intact skeletal remains of enslaved and free Africans who lived and worked in colonial New York.

Do you have time for a longer daytrip? Visit the Weir Farm  (pictured above) in Wilton, CT which preserves the life and home of Julian Alden Weir, one of America’s most influential Impressionists. An even longer trip could include the Washington-Rochambeau Trail that goes from Massachusetts to Virginia following the path taken by the Revolutionary War participants as the French joined forces with Washington’s army.

Can’t decide? The National Park Service website has a feature where you can search for a park by State.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt said, “There is nothing so American as our national parks…. The fundamental idea behind the parks…is that the country belongs to the people that it is in process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us.”

Go out and enjoy them!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services