Tag Archives: fiction

Afternoon Book Discussion

With Lisa Jones, Readers’ Services Librarian

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

1:30 PM               

Set at the end of World War II, in a crumbling Bavarian castle that once played host to all of German high society, a powerful and propulsive story of three widows whose lives and fates become intertwined. The Women in the Castle is a dramatic yet nuanced portrait of war and its repercussions that explores what it means to survive, love, and, ultimately, to forgive in the wake of unimaginable hardship.                           

 (from the publisher)

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Lisa J., Readers’ Services

 

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Afternoon Book Discussion

“A tale inspired by the first wife of Albert Einstein, follows the experiences of Mitza Mari, a female physics student at an elite late-nineteenth-century school in Zurich, where she falls in love with a charismatic fellow student who eclipses her contributions to his theory of relativity.”

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

1:30 PM

With Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services

 This program is free.

No registration required.

Books available at the Circulation Desk one month prior to event.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

 

AUTHOR VISIT & SIGNING WITH ROBERT KARMON

Robert Karmon is an award winning playwright, published poet, short story writer and published screenwriter, who has worked on screenplays for Columbia pictures, CBS and Eddie Murphy Production.

Join us on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 2 PM to hear Mr. Karmon discuss his novel Isaac and the writer’s life.  Isaac, based on a true story of the Holocaust, follows the epic journey of a young boy from near-death to ultimate triumph as a man.

Copies of Isaac will be sold by

the Friends of the Library at the event (Cash Only).

This program is free.

No registration required.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be

used for library publicity.

-posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

5 Years on the Blog – December

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in December in the past five years, which are all about our staff’s reading during those years:

2016: Our Favorite Books of 2016 (Part 6)

2015: Our Favorite Books of 2015

2014: Our Favorite Books of 2014

2013: About Our Reading -2013 #1

2012: Questions about Books: 2012, Part 1

We’ll take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in January.  Happy New Year to all!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our Favorite Reads – 2017 (Part II)

In today’s post we continue to look back at our reading during 2017 and sharing the books that were some of our favorites for the year.

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas Evelyn

After witnessing her friend’s death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter’s life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.

 

Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services:

In the Sea There Are Crocodiles by Fabio Geda 

In a fictional retelling of a true story, ten-year-old Enaiat leaves his small Afghanistan village after the Taliban takes over in 2000, and when his mother is forced to leave him in Pakistan, he endures a five-year ordeal to make his way to Italy.

 

Brenda, Reference Services Librarian:

Dead Wake by Eric Larson 

A chronicle of the sinking of the Lusitania discusses the factors that led to the tragedy and the contributions of such figures as Woodrow Wilson, bookseller Charles Lauriat, and architect Theodate Pope Riddle.

 

Lisa H., Reference Services Librarian:

Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan

After moving to America, a shy and responsible older sister and a gregarious young sister who thrives in their new Boston home endure the long-term repercussions of a fateful decision when the younger sister becomes pregnant.

 

Megan, Systems Manager:

Generation V by M. L. Brennan

Fortitude Scott?s life is a mess. A degree in film theory has left him with zero marketable skills, his job revolves around pouring coffee, his roommate hasn?t paid rent in four months, and he?s also a vampire. Well, sort of. He?s still mostly human. But when a new vampire comes into his family?s territory and young girls start going missing, Fort can?t ignore his heritage anymore.

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Peace Like a River by Leif Enger

Young Reuben Land has little doubt that miracles happen all around us, suspecting that his own father is touched by God. When his older brother flees a controversial murder charge, Reuben, along with his older sister and father, set off on a journey that will take them to the Badlands and through a landscape more extraordinary than they could have anticipated.

Meghan, Reference Services Librarian:

Eliza and her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

When the anonymous teen creator of a wildly popular webcomic is tempted by a school newcomer to pursue real-world relationships, everything she has worked so hard to build crumbles in the wake of their highly publicized romance.

Jean S.. Readers’ Services Librarian:

Sing, Unburied, Sing ​by Jesmyn Ward 

Living with his grandparents and toddler sister on a Gulf Coast farm, Jojo navigates the challenges of his tormented mother’s addictions and his grandmother’s terminal cancer before the release of his father from prison prompts a road trip of danger and hope.

If you would like to see some of our favorites of 2016, you can look here and here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books – 2017 (Part I)

In today’s post we are looking back at our reading during 2017 and sharing the books that were some of our favorites for the year.

Pam M., Assistant Library Director:

The Nix by Nathan Hill

Astonished to see the mother who abandoned him in childhood throwing rocks at a presidential candidate, a bored college professor struggles to reconcile the media depictions of his mother with his memories and decides to draw her out by penning a tell-all biography.

 

Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore

When electric light innovator Thomas Edison sues his only remaining rival for patent infringement, George Westinghouse hires untested Columbia Law School graduate Paul Ravath for a case fraught with lies, betrayals, and deception.

 

Jessikah, Children’s Services Librarian:

Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

Having heard tales of the beautiful but dangerous Goblin King all her life, Liesl infuses her musical compositions with her romantic dreams before the abduction of her sister forces her to journey to the Underground, where she faces an impossible choice.

 

Amy, Children’s Services Librarian:

Fever by Mary Beth Keane 

A story inspired by the life of the woman known as “Typhoid Mary” traces the efforts of a headstrong Irish immigrant whose tenacity and talent for cooking gains her entry into upper-class kitchens until the discovery of her status as a disease carrier forces her into an isolation that she eventually defies with horrific results.

 

Sue Ann, Head of Children’s Services:

Will’s Red Coat by Tom Ryan

The best-selling author of Following Atticus traces the author’s adoption of a traumatized, hearing-impaired elderly dog who throughout his remaining years transformed from a hostile and violent canine to a happy, puppy-like companion

 

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian:

Beartown by Fredrik Backman 

In the tiny forest community of Beartown, the possibility that the amateur hockey team might win a junior championship, bringing the hope of revitalization to the fading town, is shattered by the aftermath of a violent act that leaves a young girl traumatized.

(All summaries from the publishers.)

We will be sharing another batch of favorites in a day or two, so stay tuned.  If you would like to see some of our favorites of 2016, you can look here and here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

We Read Some Holiday Books…

The Twelve Clues of Christmas

by Rhys Bowen

“She may be thirty-fifth in line for the throne, but Lady Georgiana Rannoch cannot wait to ring in the new year—before a Christmas killer wrings another neck…

‘On the first day of Christmas, my true love gave to me—well, actually, my true love, Darcy O’Mara, is spending a feliz navidad tramping around South America. Meanwhile, Mummy is holed up in a tiny village called Tiddleton-under-Lovey with that droll Noel Coward! And I’m snowed in at Castle Rannoch with my bumbling brother, Binky, and sourpuss sister-in-law, Fig.

So it’s a miracle when I contrive to land a position as hostess to a posh holiday party in Tiddleton. The village is like something out ofA Christmas Carol! But no sooner have I arrived than a neighborhood nuisance, a fellow named Freddie falls out of a tree, dead…. Dickensian, indeed!:” -from the publisher

Brenda, Reference Librarian says,  “What fun! This book has an engaging heroine, a quirky supporting cast and a clever plot. The love interest between Lady Georgiana Rannoch and Darcy O’Mara is sweet. I would be happy to visit the village of Tiddleton-under-Lovey, Devonshire if it existed! I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of reading this cozy mystery.’ “

How the Finch Stole Christmas

by Donna Andrews

“Meg Langslow’s husband has decided to escalate his one-man show of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol into a full-scale production with a large cast including their sons Jamie and Josh as Tiny Tim and young Scrooge and Meg helping as stage manager.

The show must go on, even if the famous―though slightly over-the-hill―actor who’s come to town to play the starring role of Scrooge has brought a sleigh-load of baggage and enemies with him. And why is Caerphilly suddenly overrun with a surplus of beautiful caged finches?” -from the publisher

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian says, “I have always wanted to try a book in this cozy mystery series .  The murder did not happen until fully halfway through the novel. Until then the reader gets to know Meg, her extended family and friends as well as the town Caerphilly at Christmastime with sometimes over the top detail.  I liked the book much better after the body appeared rather than before but I don’t think I’ll be returning to Caerphilly anytime soon.”

Have you read any books set around the winter holidays? Tell us about them in the comments.

Read about other holiday books in past posts, here or here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services