Tag Archives: best

The 2018 Edgar Award Nominations

The Mystery Writers of America revealed the nominees for the 2018 Edgar Allan Poe Awards on January 19th.  These awards honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television.  On April 26, 2018, the Edgar Awards will be presented to the winners in New York City.  If you are interested in the full list of nominees, in all categories, you can visit their website.  Here are  the titles for the category of Best Novel:

Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

Forced by duty to return to his racially divided East Texas hometown, an African-American Texas Ranger risks his job and reputation to investigate a highly charged double-murder case involving a black Chicago lawyer and a local white woman.

 

The Dime by Kathleen Kent

A woman from a family of take-no-prisoners police detectives relocates from Brooklyn to Dallas, where she tackles adversaries ranging from drug cartels and cult leaders to difficult vagrants and society wives before a first major investigation is challenged by unruly subordinates, a stalker, a criminal organization and an unsupportive girlfriend.

 

 

Prussian Blue by Philip Kerr

Hiding on the French Riviera when his cover is blown, Bernie Gunther finds himself in a cat-and-mouse game with an old and dangerous enemy before fleeing to Berlin, where he places his survival in the hands of dubious former allies.

 

 

A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee

In the days of the British Raj in 1919, Captain Sam Wyndham, a former Scotland Yard detective newly arrived in Calcutta, is confronted with the murder of a British official who was found with a note in his mouth warning the British to leave India.

 

The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti 

A once-professional killer protects his daughter from the legacy of his criminal past, an effort that is challenged by his daughter’s struggles with the death of her mother and the reckoning of old enemies.

 

All summaries are from the publishers.   

 

*This article first appeared in the February 2018 issue of Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider.*                       

-posted by Jean S., Readers’ Services 

 

Advertisements

Oscar Winners Based on Books

The 90 th Academy Awards ceremonies are set for this Sunday, March 4 at 8 pm Eastern time.  Many of the past winners for Best Picture were based on books.  Here are some of them from recent years:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

12 Years a Slave (2013) based on the book of the same title,

Argo (2012) based on the book, The Master of Disguise: My Secret Life in the CIA by Antonio J. Mendez with Malcolm McConnell.

Slumdog Millionaire (2008) based on the book, Q & A by Vikas Swarup.

No Country for Old Men (2007) based on the book of the same title by Cormac McCarthy.

Million Dollar Baby (2004) based on Rope Burns: Stories from the Corner by F. X. Toole.

How many awards do you think will be given to films based on books this Sunday??

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

Our Favorite Books – 2017 (Part I)

In today’s post we are looking back at our reading during 2017 and sharing the books that were some of our favorites for the year.

Pam M., Assistant Library Director:

The Nix by Nathan Hill

Astonished to see the mother who abandoned him in childhood throwing rocks at a presidential candidate, a bored college professor struggles to reconcile the media depictions of his mother with his memories and decides to draw her out by penning a tell-all biography.

 

Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore

When electric light innovator Thomas Edison sues his only remaining rival for patent infringement, George Westinghouse hires untested Columbia Law School graduate Paul Ravath for a case fraught with lies, betrayals, and deception.

 

Jessikah, Children’s Services Librarian:

Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

Having heard tales of the beautiful but dangerous Goblin King all her life, Liesl infuses her musical compositions with her romantic dreams before the abduction of her sister forces her to journey to the Underground, where she faces an impossible choice.

 

Amy, Children’s Services Librarian:

Fever by Mary Beth Keane 

A story inspired by the life of the woman known as “Typhoid Mary” traces the efforts of a headstrong Irish immigrant whose tenacity and talent for cooking gains her entry into upper-class kitchens until the discovery of her status as a disease carrier forces her into an isolation that she eventually defies with horrific results.

 

Sue Ann, Head of Children’s Services:

Will’s Red Coat by Tom Ryan

The best-selling author of Following Atticus traces the author’s adoption of a traumatized, hearing-impaired elderly dog who throughout his remaining years transformed from a hostile and violent canine to a happy, puppy-like companion

 

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian:

Beartown by Fredrik Backman 

In the tiny forest community of Beartown, the possibility that the amateur hockey team might win a junior championship, bringing the hope of revitalization to the fading town, is shattered by the aftermath of a violent act that leaves a young girl traumatized.

(All summaries from the publishers.)

We will be sharing another batch of favorites in a day or two, so stay tuned.  If you would like to see some of our favorites of 2016, you can look here and here.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

Our Favorite Books of 2016

books3In what has become a tradition here at Syosset R and R, we will be running a series of blog posts throughout the month of December telling you about our staff’s favorite reads for this year.  The books mentioned were read during 2016 but not necessarily published in 2016. Here goes:

Karen, Library Director:

orphan 8Orphan #8 by Kim van Alkemade 

When hospice nurse Rachel realizes that her new patient is the doctor that spent years subjecting her to tortuous medical experiments at a Jewish orphanage, she is forced to confront her memories of the time and their lasting effect.

Pam. M., Assistant Library Director:

behold-the-dreamersBehold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

An immigrant working class couple from Cameroon and the upper class American family for whom they work find their lives and marriages shaped by financial circumstances, infidelities, secrets, and the 2008 recession.

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

my-name-is-lucy-bartonLucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn’t spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy’s childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lie the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy’s lif

state_of_wonderState of Wonder by Ann Patchett

A researcher at a pharmaceutical company, Marina Singh must step out of her comfort zone when she is sent into the heart of the Amazonian delta to check on a field team that has been silent for two years–a dangerous assignment that forces Marina to confront the ghosts of her past.

Sharon, Head of Teen Services:

burn-baby-burnBurn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

During the summer of 1977 when New York City is besieged by arson, a massive blackout, and a serial killer named Son of Sam, seventeen-year-old Nora must also face her family’s financial woes, her father’s absence, and her brother’s growing violence.

“This YA book is set in NYC during the summer of 1977, and reading about the terror of Son of Sam, the blackout and all the crime was really eye-opening for me.  I tend to forget how dangerous it was in the city back then because for as long as I can remember, it’s been cleaned up and Disney-fied, but 1977 was a crazy time to be a teenager!”

and-i-darkenAnd I Darken by Kiersten White

In this first book in a trilogy a girl child is born to Vlad Dracula, in Transylvania, in 1435–at first rejected by her father and always ignored by her mother, she will grow up to be Lada Dragwlya, a vicious and brutal princess, destined to rule and destroy her enemies.

“This was the Dracula story reimagined as a dark and brooding teenage girl. The settings and the story were magical.  Loved it!”

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

red-queenWhen her supernatural powers manifest in front of a noble court, Mare, a thief in a world divided between commoners and superhumans, is forced to assume the role of lost princess before risking everything to help a growing rebellion.

“This is a dystopian trilogy where the color of your blood (red or silver) determines your fate. Some similarities to the Hunger Games, but very well-written and has a fabulous female protagonist.”

(All summaries from the publishers.)

Keep checking in with Syosset R and R for more of our favorite reads of 2016!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

If It’s February…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

…then it’s BLACK HISTORY MONTH.  Come in and see our main floor display which covers the African- American experience on the road to freedom and their contributions to American art and culture.

We also have a display for AWARD WINNERS which includes Adult Fiction books awarded the Pulitzer, National Book Award or Man Booker Prize.  Authors awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature are included as well. Of course our paperback collection has many romance novels to read on VALENTINE’S DAY and for the rest of the month.

If it’s February…then it’s AMERICAN HEART MONTH. Our health reference librarian has gathered lots of books and handouts with the latest information on maintaining a healthy heart.   Also at this time of year we are getting ready for the OSCARS.  Want to know the history of the Oscar and its winners? We’ve got a book display for that. Both of these displays can be found on the third floor.

Remember: Syosset Public Library honors our patrons’ purchase requests for items.  If we don’t purchase an  item for you, we will make every effort to interloan it from another library.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books of 2014

Nearing the end of every year we are inundated by Best of the Year lists. Of course at a library we pay the most attention to the lists of best books.  We here at Syosset R and R would like to add to the mix and tell you what our reading favorites were for 2014.  Our staff was asked to tell us what books they enjoyed most during the year and the books did not have to be published 2014.

Today’s post will be our last for this series, featuring the picks of –

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Karen, Library Director:

We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas

SueAnn, Head of Children’s Services:

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

The Light in the Ruins by Chris Bohjalian

My Gentle Barn by Ellie Laks

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healy

Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast

Lisa J., Readers’ Services Librarian:

The Invention of Wings  by Sue Monk Kidd

The Paris Architect by Charles Belfoure

The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman

Jessikah, Children’s Services Librarian:

 My Real Children by Jo Walton was something I really enjoyed.

Susan, Reference Librarian:

 Shanghai Girls by Lisa See

City of Thieves by David Benioff

Lucia, Lucia by Adriana Trigiani

Tell us about some of your favorite reads of 2014 by making a comment below. To see all other “Our Favorite Books of 2014” please click here.

– posted by Sonia, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books of 2014

Nearing the end of every year we are inundated by Best of the Year lists. Of course at a library we pay the most attention to the lists of best books.  We here at Syosset R and R would like to add to the mix and tell you what our reading favorites were for 2014.  Our staff was asked to tell us what books they enjoyed most during the year and the books did not have to be published during this year.

Today, Amy, Children’s Services Librarian and Sonia, Reference Librarian share their 2014 favorites.

Amy’s picks:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan

Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig by Jonathan Eig.

Yes Please by Amy Poehler.

Palisades Park by Alan Brennert

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

Food: A Love Story by Jim Gaffigan

Sonia’s Picks:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In the Last Analysis by Amanda Cross (finally found another really good mystery series.)

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert (even if you didn’t care for Eat, Pray, Love, give her another try.)

Middlemarch by George Eliot (Maybe the best book I’ve ever read)

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (Reread of my favorite book – even better the second time around)

A Breath of Snow and Ashes by Diana Gabaldon (No, I’m not up to date on these: I never want them to end!)

Have a very Happy New Year!

– posted by Sonia, Reference Services