Category Archives: reference

Five Years on the Blog: April

Today we’re to going reminisce a bit and take a look at some of Syosset RandR’s blog posts for April during the past five years:

2016: Audiobooks We LIke

2015: Earth Day’s 45th Anniversary

2014: Put a Poem in Your Pocket Today

2013: Why Not a Mystery?

2012: 5 for the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction

Watch out for our next look down blog memory lane again in May!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

April is National Poetry Month…

Do you like poetry? Come up to the Library’s third floor to sample a new poem. We have a bucket filled with copies of poetry for you to enjoy.

Can’t visit the library in person? May I suggest visiting the Library of Congress online? The venerable LC has so many hidden treasures. This month I suggest looking at Poetry 180.

This project by former Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a selection of poems for each day in the school year. Its target audience is high school students but it is open to everyone. It is a great way to discover new poets and their works:  “The Bagel” made me smile; every parent can identify with “To a Daughter Leaving Home.”

Poems are wonderful to read but they are even better when you hear them. So check out the LC’s Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature. This amazing source has audio recordings of many famous poets as well as lectures about poetry. There is an interview with Robert Frost (1959) which includes him reading some of his work. And Archibald MacLeish reads and comments on his poetry in 1963. You also can hear Margaret Atwood, Alan Dugan (I just discovered his “On the Long Island Railroad System”), Joyce Carol Oates, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Pinsky and Gwendolyn Brooks.

The Poetry Foundation  is another great resource. You can listen to the works by such people as Dylan Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar, John Dunne,Gerard Manley Hopkins and Robert Frost   You can search the Foundation’s collection of poems. They have a section of poems under 25 lines  and another section of poems by literary forms and terms.

Glance at any of these sites and you just might be inspired to write a line or two of poetry yourself. Or you might discover a discover something special! I liked this one by the 17thcentury poet Duchess of Newcastle Margaret Cavendish, “An Apology for Her Poetry.” It ends with the lines:

“Consider, pray, gold hath no life therein.”

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

April’s Book Displays

Spring is in the air and time to get creative. One of our first floor displays, “From Blog to Book”, could help you. It has lots of cookbooks, biographies, home decorating and eclectic collections of essays.  The cookbooks cover the topics of healthy cooking, baking of pastries and pies and catering for parties.

“The Bestseller’s Club” is the topic for the other main floor display. If you have a favorite author or couple of favorites who are bestselling authors, this service is for you. You can automatically reserve the latest book by your favorite author(s). Select from over 200 popular writers.  Ask at the Readers’ Service desk on the second floor for more information.

The mini displays are “Books to Screen”  which includes such titles as Big Little Liars by Liane Moriarty, The Dinner by Herman Koch and Drums of Autumn by Diane Gabaldon; and  “National Poetry Month”, books of poems for a change of pace.

On the third floor “April is Defeat Diabetes Month” is the topic for our health collection display featuring books on the disease and how to control it. You can read an entire book, get a cookbook on diabetes diet or use one the handy-tip sheets on this timely subject.

Our last display is a little different, topic: “Mathematics Awareness Month”.  Math is pure science and analytics.  Stretch your mind with a book from this display.

Hope our displays spur your interest and give you something different to read.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

5 Years on the Blog: March

Today we’re to going reminisce a bit and take a look at some of Syosset RandR’s blog posts for March during the past five years:

2016: Celebrating the Emerald Isle

2015: Preservation Workshop

2014: 10 Classics Its Time to Reread This Spring!

2013: Agatha’s Own Favorites

2012: Scanning & Faxing @ Syosset Library

Hope you enjoyed taking a walk down memory lane.  We’ll do it again next month, keep an eye out!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

February’s Book Displays

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Our first display on the main floor is a gift for book lovers, “Best Sellers You Might Have Missed”. It includes a large selection by the most popular authors, including John Grisham, Clive Cussler, Bernard Cornwell, Anne Rice, John Le Carre, Debbie Macomber, Fern Michaels, Jodi Picoult, Danielle Steel, Joyce Carol Oates and more.

“Books about American Activism” is the theme for our second display. It covers American history as the great experiment to begin the world anew.  Learn about the Civil Rights Movement for racial equality, the Women’s Rights from suffragettes to Roe V. Wade, the Gay Revolution and the history of U.S. Labor Movement. 

The 2 mini book displays are “British Library Crime Classics” and “2017 Edgar Award Nominees.  Check out these displays for some fun mystery reads.

On the third floor our health librarian’s display is “Affairs of the Heart-February is American Heart Month”.  Read about your heart, how it works, how to keep it healthy, how to talk to your cardiologist, what to eat and more. If a book is too time consuming, take home some of the informative handouts on the warning signs of a heart attack and how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Hope that this display will provide you with useful guides to staying heart-healthy.

“After the Inauguration-Presidents in Offices” is our second display on the third floor.  The books covers the White House and its residents thru the ages. Find out about past president’s governing styles, their religious beliefs, the staffing of the White House, and the role of the First Ladies. See how history has judged our past leaders.

Once again the staff of SPL offers some suggestions for your reading pleasure.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Happy New Year: Our January Displays

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Our book displays this month celebrate the New Year.  The first display on the first floor is “Best Books of 2016”.  It includes both fiction and non-fiction. The titles were selected from newspaper’s best seller lists, various publisher’s starred lists and librarians’ favorites.  Browse the selection to see what catches you eye and have a good read on a long winter’s night.

The second display is “January is International Creativity Month”. What better time to learn a new skill or take up a new hobby, than the start of a new year? If you’re in the mood to improve your creative skills try one of our suggestions.

The two mini displays are “Best Sellers of 2016” and “Best Books of 2007”.  So you have more suggested books to read with “best of” in their description.

Our third floor displays are “New Year New You” and “Use Laughter to Warm Up This Winter”:

Once again our health librarian has selected books to help us learn the best ways to stay healthy. Tips for healthy eating and dieting, instructions for physical fitness and exercise, and mindfulness training for relaxing and getting rid of stress.  As always handouts are part of this display.   I’m going to try the “31-Day Push-Up Challenge”.

Last but not least is “Use Laughter to Warm Up This Winter”.  Lots of books on classic comedy of the Honeymooners, Seinfeld, Flip, Monty Python, Amos and Andy, SNL, Stephen Colbert and the Keystone Cops and more.

So, Happy New Year, and celebrate with a best book, a new creative skill, healthy life style or just a good laugh.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Our Favorite Books of 2016 (Pt. 7, the last)

booksIn what has become a tradition here at Syosset R and R, we will be running a series of blog posts throughout the month of December telling you about our staff’s favorite reads for this year.  The books mentioned were read during 2016 but not necessarily published in 2016. Here’s the seventh and last installment:

Meghan, Reference Librarian:

Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland

life-in-motioProfiles the life and career of the professional ballerina, covering from when she began dance classes at age thirteen in an after-school community center through becoming the only African American soloist dancing with the American Ballet Theatre.

Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

voyagerContinues the story of Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser that began with the now-classic novel Outlander and continued in Dragonfly in Amber, sweeping us from the battlefields of eighteenth-century Scotland to the exotic West Indies.

The House at Riverton By Kate Morton

house-at-rivertonLiving out her final days in a nursing home, ninety-eight-year-old Grace remembers the secrets surrounding the 1924 suicide of a young poet during a glittering society party hosted by Grace’s English aristocrat employers, a family that is shattered by war.

Sue Ann, Head of Children’s Services:

man-called-oveA Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

A curmudgeon hides a terrible personal loss beneath a cranky and short-tempered exterior while clashing with new neighbors, a boisterous family whose chattiness and habits lead to unexpected friendship.

Audrey, Media Services Clerk:

News of the World by Paulette Jiles

news-of-the-worldIn the aftermath of the Civil War, Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, an elderly widower and itinerant news reader, is offered fifty dollars to bring an orphan girl, who was kidnapped and raised by Kiowa raiders, from Wichita Falls back to her family in San Antonio.

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler

sweetbitterA year in the life of a beguiling young woman in the wild world of a famous downtown New York restaurant follows her burning effort to become someone of importance through a backwaiter job that enables her indulgences in culinary and intellectual interests.

moonglowMoonglow by Michael Chabon

A man bears witness to his grandfather’s deathbed confessions, which reveal his family’s long-buried history and his involvement in a mail-order novelty company, World War II, and the space program.

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

dragonfly-in-amberIn the sequel to Outlander,  Claire Randall and her daughter, Brianna, return to the majestic hills of Scotland, where Claire recalls the love of her life–gallant warrior James Fraser.

“I re-read this while watching the Outlander television series’ second season and it was better than the first time.”

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

career-of-evilWhen a woman’s severed leg is delivered to Robin Ellacott, her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, has to look into his past to determine who is responsible.

“This is the third installment of J. K. Rowling’s detective mystery series that she’s writing under a pseudonym, and I am finding them very enjoyable.”

Am I Alone Here? Notes on Living to Read and Reading to Live by Peter Orner

am-i-alone-hereA collection of 41 short essays about reading and life reflects the acclaimed writer’s beliefs about the role of stories in shaping his identity.

” I’m a big fan of books about books and reading and read several this year.  I enjoyed this one the most. The problem with this type of book is that you always end up with a list of other books you’ll want to read.”

(All plot summaries from the publishers.)

Please tell us in the comments what your favorite 2016 reads were.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services