Category Archives: reference

50 Years Ago…

The library has a display on the third floor commemorating the 50th anniversary of the watershed year 1968. In a Time magazine article earlier this year historian Jon Meacham compared the year 1968 to 1776, 1861 and 1941 as a time when everything in U.S. history changed http://time.com/5107482/50-years-after-1968-still-living-in-its-shadow/

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It was indeed a turbulent year. It was a sad year marked by the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. There was anger. In January the Viet Cong launched the Tet Offensive. Protests against the Vietnam War escalated with demonstrations on university campuses and at the Democratic National Convention. Olympic runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in a Black Power salute during the Olympic medal ceremony in Mexico City.

Lyndon Johnson surprisingly announced he would not run for reelection. Richard Nixon was elected as the 37th President in November.

 

The Prague Spring began the year with hope when Alexander Dubcek was chosen as the Czech leader promising a government of “socialism with a human face.” But when members of the Warsaw Pact invaded Czechoslovakia with tanks and troops the period of liberalizing reforms quickly ended and totalitarian Soviet rule was reinstated.

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But there were lighter notes that year. Some cultural highlights included the first TV broadcast of “60 Minutes” and “Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.” In the movies “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Planet of the Apes” were popular. And “Hair” opened in London. The year also saw the introduction of Hot Wheels toy cars and McDonald’s Big Mac. The Beatles started Apple records with “Hey Jude” as its first single.

The year ended on a high note with the successful Apollo 8 mission. Astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William A. Anders became the first humans to see the far side of the moon.

Visit the library and choose a book (or two!) from the display to increase your understanding of this time period.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

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What We’re Reading Now

We’re checking in with our staff today to see what they’re reading:

Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services:

“I just finished rereading the 2011 National Book Award Fiction Winner, Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward:  An incredible story of one poverty stricken family’s decision to ride out Hurricane Katrina in their coastal Mississippi home. Highly recommended!”

Enduring a hardscrabble existence as the children of alcoholic and absent parents, four siblings from a coastal Mississippi town prepare their meager stores for the arrival of Hurricane Katrina while struggling with such challenges as a teen “pregnancy and a dying litter of prize pups.*

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian:

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens – the best book I read this year.”

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. She’s barefoot and wild; unfit for polite society. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark. But Kya is not what they say.*

Amy, Children’s Services Librarian:

“Currently reading: This Will Only Hurt a Little by Busy Philipps.”

Presents a memoir by the beloved comedic actress known for her roles on Freaks and GeeksDawson’s Creek and Cougar Town, who has become a breakout star on Instagram.*

 

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian:

Just finished Vox by Christina Dalcher. Dr. Jean McClellan is haunted by her complacency during her college days in this dystopian novel in the not-so-far future.  The United States government has put women in “their rightful place” by systematically limiting the words they can use each day.  Is 100 words a day enough to make a change?  Dr. McClellan truly hopes so.”

Pam M., Assistant Library Director:

The German Girl by Armando Lucas Correa”

Stripped of her family’s privileges by the Nazi party in 1939 Berlin, Hannah Rosenthal forges a pact that she will remain true to her best friend, Leo, before embarking on a refugee ship bound for Havana, where rumors of a deadly plot force her to make an impossible choice.*

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Genius Foods by Max Lugavere  This is a fascinating book about how what we eat affects our brains, and in turn, the rest of our bodies.”

Draws on the author’s in-depth research into dementia in the wake of his own mother’s mysterious diagnosis to outline practical recommendations for optimizing mental performance and balance through a high-nutrition diet tailored specifically for brain health.*

*Summary from the publisher.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November Book Displays

Don’t know what to read with so many great books in the library?  Try this month’s “Staff Picks” display. The display is a selection of favorites of the SPL staff. Our staff is made of avid readers so their picks will insure an enjoyable read. As usual, there is a lot to choose from.

The second display on the main floor is  “November – Memoir Month.” Truth can be stranger and more entertaining than fiction. Read someone’s life story. You can also listen to their stories on audio books. Some memoirs which have been made into movies are available on DVD for your viewing pleasure.

The two mini displays this month are:

* “The Great American Reads, The Top Fifteen Finalists”

* “Goodreads Awards, The Choice Awards for the Best Books of 2018”

*MIni-displays are subject to change during the month.

The third floor health librarian’s display is “November is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month”. The books here help explain the disease and how to cope with it for both the patient and caregivers. Also on the display are Fact Sheet handouts which include information on legal and financial planning for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

One more theme for November is “Native American Heritage Month”. Learn the history of the first people to inhabit the Americas, it is a story of diverse groups of people. Books include information on their culture, art, music, jewelry, and languages.

Hope our displays help you to make your reading choices easier and more varied. Enjoy!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

It is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse culture, traditions and histories, and to acknowledge the contributions, of Native Peoples.

The library has a display of books on the third floor. But if you can’t visit the library and want to expand your understanding of the First Peoples, there are many informative websites.

Check out a collaborative effort from the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, the National Park Service, and the Smithsonian and others paying tribute to the rich heritage of Native Americans. You can see a selection from these institutions from the comfort of your home. The online offerings span a wide range of topics from photographs by Edward Curtis to efforts to save the Cherokee language to the music of the Omaha and a selection from the National Gallery of ArtNative Languages  has compiled information about many aspects of Native culture. There is a list of internet resources for everything from biographies to technology and crafts and histories and you can  search by name of tribe for stories and legends too.

The website of the National Congress of the American Indian  has an online guide outlining the governance of tribes in the United States, Tribal Nations and the United States . You can also search for tribes by name or by location. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (with physical locations in DC and NYC) allows you to visit its exhibitions right from your computer. Fittingly, during this month when we celebrate Veterans’ Day, the museum has an online exhibit detailing the contributions of Native Americans who have fought in every war. Take a look at the valuable contributions of the Code Talkers during World War II.

And it’s not just history. Native culture is alive and well! Take a look at the current exhibit at the Museum of the American Indian’s New York space. Titled “Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound”, it joins traditional art with current media using light, digital projection and experimental media.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Election Day: Don’t Forget to Vote!

Election Day November 6, 2018 is upon us. The Nassau County Board of Elections has list of candidates with party affiliations for your consideration.

You can check on your registration information and get information about your election district and voting location by entering your name and some other identifying information.

The Vote411 site allows you to find your voting place and create a personal ballot to compare candidates for races in your district. Simply type in your address and the races that you can vote in come up. You can compare the candidates (some have submitted personal statements and biographies) so that you are ready to vote when you get to the polling place on Tuesday.

If you want a good look at a candidate’s biography, voting record, speeches, ratings and funding, consult Project Vote Smart. Simply type in a candidate’s name and then choose the topic you want to see. There is also a tab called Vote Easy; by entering your zip code and then answering some questions and giving their importance to you the site will give you the candidate who most closely match your preferences.

After you cast your vote on Tuesday you can follow the results on Politico. From that homepage you can click on the individual states to see how candidates are faring.

In the 2016 Presidential election only about 6 in 10 eligible voters cast their ballots. In the previous midterms (2010 and 2014) only about 4 in 10 voted.  Remember to vote!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

5 Years on the Blog

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in October during the past five years:

2017:  MYSTERY WRITER SUE GRAFTON IS RUNNING OUT OF LETTERS

2016: OCTOBER’S BOOK DISPLAYS

2015: BACK TO THE FUTURE WEEK CONTINUES!

2014: RESEARCH YOUR FAMILY TREE

2013: PLAN AHEAD FOR A FUN AND FESTIVE YEAR END BOOK CLUB MEETING

Watch out for when we take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in December.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

October Book Displays

The theme for the first main floor display is It’s A Spooky Time of Year, containing books to get you in the Halloween spirit. Ideas for party planning, crafts, decorating, costumes, and trick-or-treating. The display also includes some good old fashioned ghost stories and tales of haunted houses.

Games People Play is the topic for the second display. Learn about the history, rules and people involved with various sports and games, such as baseball, basketball, golf, tennis, soccer, poker, and bowling.  The display includes both DVDs and books- a great collection for the sport enthusiast!

The themes for the two current* mini displays are:

The Great American Read (voted on by the American public) includes both lots of great reads and a bibliography of the great reads.

October 5th is James Bond Day – 007 is a collection of both books and movies about the fictional British spy.

*Mini displays are subject to change during the month.

 

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Currently on the third floor, the first display is Mental Health Awareness Week which is October 7-13.   You will  find books and handouts on all types of mental illness. The website for more information is http://www.MHAWEEK.org. For the rest of the month, this display will focus on October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

The next third floor display is October is Family History Month.  If you want to learn more about your genealogy, this display is for you. Besides the books to help locate resources and guides to using the resources, the reference librarians have created a useful handout, Resources for the Amateur Genealogist, a must-see for any budding genealogist!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services