Category Archives: reference

Our Next Health Reference Program

Colon Cancer Awareness

Friday, February 15, 2019 at 11AM

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer afflicting all Americans regarding of age, gender or race. In fact, the incidence and prevalence of colon cancer is increasing in younger and younger populations.

Join us for an informative talk from Northwell Health Colorectal Surgeon, Dr. Shirley Shih, on how to prevent,diagnose and treat this disease in anticipation of colon cancer awareness month in March. Dr. Shih grew up locally in Jericho where her parents still reside. She graduated from Jericho HS and went to Stanford University where she completed a Bachelors of Arts in Human Biology, followed by medical school at Albany Medical College and a  surgical residency at George Washington University Hospital. Dr. Shih completed a year of colorectal research in Weston, FL at the Cleveland Clinic and then proceeded to finish a year of clinical colorectal fellowship at Indiana University. She practiced in the suburbs of Philadelphia for 7 years before returning home to Long Island to join Northwell Health as a board certified colorectal surgeon.

This program is free. 

Photographs and videos taken during

library programs may be used for library publicity.

Light refreshments will be served. All are welcome.

Health Professionals’ schedules can change,

please call to confirm program.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

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Our January Book Displays

Happy New Year to all our patrons!

Our first display is Best Books of 2018 on the main  floor. There are a lot of choices and all great reads. Included in the display are books by acclaimed authors such as Chris Bohjalian, Tana French, Barbara Kingsolver, Jodi Picoult, Ann Tyler, Kristin Hannah and more. One of my New Year‘s resolutions is to go outside my comfort zone and read books by authors with whom I’m not familiar.

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TR’s World: In Commemoration of the Centennial of the Death of Theodore Roosevelt, January 6, 1919 is the topic for second book display on the main floor. A large number of books have been written about this amazing man, a naturalist, hunter, soldier, family man and politician. He made his home in Oyster Bay, New York which is now a museum open to the public.

The main floor two mini displays* are:

Happy 75th Anniversary (1943-2018) To a Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Amos Oz (May 4, 1939-December 28, 2018)

*mini-displays are subject to change during the month*

On the third floor, the book displays are in keeping a New Year theme. The health librarian’s display is A New Year, A New You! Books here include not only diet and exercise guides, but also some on other subjects, such as how to cope with various illnesses and advice on achieving a happier life. The handouts available cover various topics that can enhance your health and your life in general.

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Today is a Great Day to Learn Something New is the theme for the second third floor display. It’s always a good idea to learn a new skill or to take up a new hobby. This display has some interesting topics such as solar panels, casino gambling and poker, swimming, horse riding, canoeing, collecting and lots of DIY (do-it-yourself).

We hope visiting Syosset Library and enjoying our facilities and resources will be a part of your New Year’s resolution!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Commemorating the Centennial of the Death of Theodore Roosevelt Today

January 6, 1919. Theodore Roosevelt died around 4 a.m. at his beloved home, Sagamore Hill home. He had been a NYS Assemblyman, NYC Police Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Colonel of the Rough Riders, NY Governor and U.S. Vice President assuming the office of President when William McKinley was assassinated. And he won the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating peace after the Russo-Japanese War. These were his official roles. He was also a rancher, a hunter, a conservationist, and an author (more than 30 books and somewhere around 150,000 letters).

Hard to believe that he was only 60 when he died. He left a legacy of civic engagement, conservation and an active lifestyle.

The Bismarck (North Dakota) Tribune eulogized him on its front page: “In the passing of Theodore Roosevelt the world loses a man. No matter how widely opinions may differ as to his politics and his methods, there is universal appreciation of those sterling qualities of virile manhood …. The life of Theodore Roosevelt marks an epoch in the development of America. He lived earnestly and sincerely. …His memory will be cherished for his genuine Americanism, his unswerving loyalty and his devotion to the public weal.”

Some Theodore Roosevelt related activities:

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    Visit our first floor book display of his life and work.

  • Join the Syosset library for a book discussion of Mark Lee Gardner’s Rough Riders January 8 at 7:30 p.m.
  • On Thursday January 17 at 2 we will have a lecture on “Roosevelt’s Life and Legacy”.
  • Roosevelt’s Oyster Bay home, Sagamore Hill, is a short drive away.
  • A train ride away is the NYC American Museum of Natural History (of which his father was a founder) where he contributed many species of birds, mammals, and amphibians he had collected during a 1914 trip to the Brazilian jungles.
  • Or start planning a summer vacation to see his profile at Mount Rushmore and his Elkhorn cabin at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Be careful of the bison out there!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

5 Years on the Blog – December

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s blog posts in December in the past five years:

2017:  OUR FAVORITE BOOKS – 2017 (PART I)

2016:  READERS’ SERVICES YEAR-END CELEBRATION AND AUTHOR VISIT

2015:  OUR FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2015

2014:  EVENING BOOK CLUB

2013:  A LITTLE CHRISTMAS IN MY MYSTERY, PLEASE! #4

Watch out for when we take another nostalgic look at the past five years again in January.

A Happy and Healthy New Year to all!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

50 Years Ago…

The library has a display on the third floor commemorating the 50th anniversary of the watershed year 1968. In a Time magazine article earlier this year historian Jon Meacham compared the year 1968 to 1776, 1861 and 1941 as a time when everything in U.S. history changed http://time.com/5107482/50-years-after-1968-still-living-in-its-shadow/

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It was indeed a turbulent year. It was a sad year marked by the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. There was anger. In January the Viet Cong launched the Tet Offensive. Protests against the Vietnam War escalated with demonstrations on university campuses and at the Democratic National Convention. Olympic runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in a Black Power salute during the Olympic medal ceremony in Mexico City.

Lyndon Johnson surprisingly announced he would not run for reelection. Richard Nixon was elected as the 37th President in November.

 

The Prague Spring began the year with hope when Alexander Dubcek was chosen as the Czech leader promising a government of “socialism with a human face.” But when members of the Warsaw Pact invaded Czechoslovakia with tanks and troops the period of liberalizing reforms quickly ended and totalitarian Soviet rule was reinstated.

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But there were lighter notes that year. Some cultural highlights included the first TV broadcast of “60 Minutes” and “Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.” In the movies “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Planet of the Apes” were popular. And “Hair” opened in London. The year also saw the introduction of Hot Wheels toy cars and McDonald’s Big Mac. The Beatles started Apple records with “Hey Jude” as its first single.

The year ended on a high note with the successful Apollo 8 mission. Astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William A. Anders became the first humans to see the far side of the moon.

Visit the library and choose a book (or two!) from the display to increase your understanding of this time period.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

What We’re Reading Now

We’re checking in with our staff today to see what they’re reading:

Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services:

“I just finished rereading the 2011 National Book Award Fiction Winner, Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward:  An incredible story of one poverty stricken family’s decision to ride out Hurricane Katrina in their coastal Mississippi home. Highly recommended!”

Enduring a hardscrabble existence as the children of alcoholic and absent parents, four siblings from a coastal Mississippi town prepare their meager stores for the arrival of Hurricane Katrina while struggling with such challenges as a teen “pregnancy and a dying litter of prize pups.*

Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian:

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens – the best book I read this year.”

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. She’s barefoot and wild; unfit for polite society. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark. But Kya is not what they say.*

Amy, Children’s Services Librarian:

“Currently reading: This Will Only Hurt a Little by Busy Philipps.”

Presents a memoir by the beloved comedic actress known for her roles on Freaks and GeeksDawson’s Creek and Cougar Town, who has become a breakout star on Instagram.*

 

Rosemarie B., Children’s Services Librarian:

Just finished Vox by Christina Dalcher. Dr. Jean McClellan is haunted by her complacency during her college days in this dystopian novel in the not-so-far future.  The United States government has put women in “their rightful place” by systematically limiting the words they can use each day.  Is 100 words a day enough to make a change?  Dr. McClellan truly hopes so.”

Pam M., Assistant Library Director:

The German Girl by Armando Lucas Correa”

Stripped of her family’s privileges by the Nazi party in 1939 Berlin, Hannah Rosenthal forges a pact that she will remain true to her best friend, Leo, before embarking on a refugee ship bound for Havana, where rumors of a deadly plot force her to make an impossible choice.*

Sonia, Health Reference Librarian:

Genius Foods by Max Lugavere  This is a fascinating book about how what we eat affects our brains, and in turn, the rest of our bodies.”

Draws on the author’s in-depth research into dementia in the wake of his own mother’s mysterious diagnosis to outline practical recommendations for optimizing mental performance and balance through a high-nutrition diet tailored specifically for brain health.*

*Summary from the publisher.

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November Book Displays

Don’t know what to read with so many great books in the library?  Try this month’s “Staff Picks” display. The display is a selection of favorites of the SPL staff. Our staff is made of avid readers so their picks will insure an enjoyable read. As usual, there is a lot to choose from.

The second display on the main floor is  “November – Memoir Month.” Truth can be stranger and more entertaining than fiction. Read someone’s life story. You can also listen to their stories on audio books. Some memoirs which have been made into movies are available on DVD for your viewing pleasure.

The two mini displays this month are:

* “The Great American Reads, The Top Fifteen Finalists”

* “Goodreads Awards, The Choice Awards for the Best Books of 2018”

*MIni-displays are subject to change during the month.

The third floor health librarian’s display is “November is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month”. The books here help explain the disease and how to cope with it for both the patient and caregivers. Also on the display are Fact Sheet handouts which include information on legal and financial planning for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

One more theme for November is “Native American Heritage Month”. Learn the history of the first people to inhabit the Americas, it is a story of diverse groups of people. Books include information on their culture, art, music, jewelry, and languages.

Hope our displays help you to make your reading choices easier and more varied. Enjoy!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services