Category Archives: reference

December’s Book Displays

In keeping with the season, our first display is Happy Holidays.  What better way to celebrate than with food!  Lots of cookbooks and guides for Christmas celebrations and Jewish holidays. The display also includes a couple of Christmas themed novels. Readers’ Services is offering the Adult Winter Reading Club and will be hosting the Year-End Readers’ Services Celebration with author Kitty Zeldis on December 17, 2019 at 2 pm. No registration is required and refreshments will be served.

Take a Byte Out of a Good Book is the theme for our second display. There is plenty to learn about computers and technology and this display has it – from the Internet, Mac Books, iCloud, Photoshop, Adobe, Access to coding, blogging, Twitter and more. Some of the books are geared towards Seniors and “Dummies.”

 

 

The two mini-displays* are:

  • Get Cozy with the Elm Creek Quilters – a series written by Jennifer Chiaverini.
  • Classics You May Have Missed.

*Mini-displays are subject to and do change during the month*

On the third floor the health librarian’s display is Consider the Caregiver. Being a caregiver is an emotionally challenging role in today’s society. In many instances, a person can be suddenly put into this role without any training. These books can help you understand how to care for a loved one and how to get them the professional help they need. Lots of handouts!

 

On the lighter side, American Art is the topic for the other third floor display. Come and enjoy this collection of oversized books with lots of pictures of American artwork – lots to see and learn.

Happy Holidays to all our wonderful Syosset Public Library patrons!

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

November is Aviation History Month…

According to the Government Printing Office “Aviation History” refers to the history of the “development of mechanical flight —from the earliest attempts in kites and gliders to the powered heavier-than-air, supersonic and space flights.”

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Many of us immediately think of Orville and Wilbur Wright as the originators of flight. These two Ohio bike shop owners did fly for 12 seconds at Kitty Hawk in 1903, marking the first time man had flown. But many had dreamed of flight and had experimented before them. Leonardo da Vinci suggested a vehicle with flapping wings imitating a bird’s flight. The French brothers, Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier, flew in a hot-air balloon in 1783. Berlin aviator Otto Lilienthal flew more than 2000 flights in gliders he designed beginning in 1891. His work actually inspired the Wright Brothers. But that successful, if short, flight on the sand dunes of North Carolina started a whole new industry. It made the world seem smaller as people and goods could travel more quickly and easily. It changed the way war was fought. And it was a pathway to the exploration of space.

Come to the library’s third floor to choose a book! There are biographies of famous aviators, illustrated books about balloons, airships, planes and spaceships, and books chronicling the development of civil and military aviation.

Can’t come to the library? Use your library card at home to access the Syosset Library’s selection of databases. Try “Biography in Context” for information about the historic figures. “Facts on File Science Online” has articles as well as videos. And Britannica and World Book in our Encyclopedia databases detail the chronology and the impact of the aeronautical industry.

If you are traveling to D.C. be sure to include a visit to the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum  on the Mall and the Udvar-Hazy Center  in nearby Chantilly. Headed out to the Seattle area? There is the impressive Museum of Flight .  If your life and work don’t allow for any travel beyond Long Island, be sure to visit Long Island’s own Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City. Did you know that the library has passes for our cardholders for the museum? Great value, convenient location. You can reserve the pass online.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Five Years in the Blog

 

Time for a walk through some of  SyossetRandR’s  past blog posts in October for the last five years:

2018:  BOOKS FOR YOUR HALLOWEEN READING PLEASURE…

2017:  CELEBRATE YOUR FAMILY! OCTOBER IS FAMILY HISTORY MONTH

2016:  OCTOBER’S BOOK DISPLAYS

2015:  NEXT WEEK’S READERS’ SERVICES EVENTS

2014:  RESEARCH YOUR FAMILY TREE

Hope you enjoyed these posts and Happy Halloween!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

October’s Book Displays

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The theme for the first display on the main floor is Spooky Time of Year. The display includes ideas for costumes, trick or treating, crafts, parties and lots of scary novels. Loads of fun reads for the Halloween season.

October is Anti-Bullying Month is the topic for the second main floor display. Bullying is any unwanted aggressive behavior and occurs in many forms: school yard bully, sexual harassment, cyberbullying and others. The books on this display describe the various types of bullying and strategies to deal with it.

The themes for the 2 mini displays* are In Memoriam:  Anne River Siddons, (1936-2019) an American novelist who wrote stories set in the southern U.S. and In Memoriam:  David Hagberg, (1942-2019) a bestselling American novelist, known for his techno-thrillers. (*Mini displays are subject to change during the month.)

The health reference display on the third floor is October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  A fatal disease which unfortunately is not rare, but can be easily caught in its early stages, thus making it treatable. Although considered a women’s disease, a very small minority of men get breast cancer as well. It’s a smart idea to educate yourself about this disease. As always, there are lots of hand-outs.

Disasters is the title of the next display. It includes books on both natural and man-made disasters, covering floods, fires, hurricanes and volcanoes. Disasters are a part of man’s and earth’s history.

Hope you come in and take a look at the displays

for fun and for education.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Things You Can Do With a Syosset Public Library Card

September is National Library Card Sign-up Month, a national celebration of public libraries and a time to make sure you and each member of your family has a library card.

Here are just some of the things you can do for free with your Syosset Public Library card:

Need get a Syosset Public Library card, the information is here.

See you at the library!

-posted by Sonia, Reference Services

 

September’s Book Displays

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As the new school year starts, Syosset Public Library is hosting our second biennial Sy-Con. In conjunction with this event, we have two book displays on the first floor, both with the same theme – Escape Reality: Enter the World of Science Fiction and Fantasy. A bonanza find of books and dvds for fans of this genre.  And it’s also a great introduction to sci-fi and fantasy for anyone interested. Sy-Con 2019 will be held at our library Friday, September 13, 6:30-8:30 pm and Saturday, September 14, 9:00 am-4:30 pm. For more information go to www.sycon.org. Don’t miss either this big event or our book displays.

The theme for the 2 mini displays* are:

On This Friday the 13th Read a Chilling Horror Novel

In Memoriam, Dorothea Benton Frank, (Sept. 12, 1951-Sept. 2, 2019), a bestselling American novelist.

*mini-displays are subject to change*

The health display on the third floor is September 1-30, Pain Awareness Month.  Pain, whether acute or chronic, is something all people deal with at some point in their lives. Learn what causes pain and what can be done to deal with pain. Included in this display is the classic Mind Over Back Pain by John Sarno, M.D. and books on gout, arthritis, neck pain, and pain management.  There are a variety of handouts on non-drug pain relief, prescription opioids and other pain management related topics. A very timely and important display.




Constitution Day  is the next display, and is a federal observance that commemorates the U.S. Constitution, which was signed on September 17, 1787. Some interesting facts about the Constitution are it originally contains 4,543 words and has been amended 27 times. For more information on the formation and application of our nation’s basic governing document, check out this display.

-posted by Betty, Reference Services

Constitution and Citizenship Day

September 17 is celebrated as Constitution and Citizenship Day commemorating the day in 1787 that the United States Constitution was signed and recognizing all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.

For four months in the summer of 1787 twelve states (Rhode Island did not attend) sent 55 men to meet in secret session in Philadelphia to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead they created a new Constitution with a stronger central government.

(1)  Which of the founding Fathers did not attend the Constitutional Convention: George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, or Thomas Jefferson?  

(2) Who is known as the “Father of the Constitution”?

(3) Which state was the ninth state (2/3 of the states then in the Union) to ratify the new constitution and when did that happen?

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The answers are (1) Thomas Jefferson was not in Philadelphia for the convention because he was serving as Minister to France (2) James Madison was called that because of his contributions as a political theorist and practical politician.  He took meticulous notes about the proceedings and, after the document was signed, he along with John Jay and Alexander Hamilton wrote the Federalist Papers campaigning for the its ratification. (3) New Hampshire signed the document on June 21, 1788 making the Constitution the law of the land.

Not everyone approved the scrapping of the Articles of Confederation or of the stronger federal government that was created. Some agreed to ratify the Constitution in the expectation that there would be some amendments limiting the federal power and safeguarding individual liberty. By December 15, 1791 there were 10 Amendments signed. They are known as the Bill of Rights.

There is a display of books on the third floor about the history of the Constitution and about the process of becoming a citizen. Curious about the framing of the Constitution but can’t get to the library? The National Archives provides an excellent history and analysis here.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services