All posts by syllib

The World Language Collection at Syosset Library

书         It is not all English!   The Syosset Public Library is happy to offer books in many languages for the reading pleasure of our patrons.

도서 The World Language Collection includes books in Chinese, French, German, Gujarati, Italian, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Tamil, and Urdu.

도서     Since the focus of the collection is on leisure reading, most of the books are novels. Included are books by native authors as well as translations of English writers.

This is an exciting collection that is always growing!

Книга      ਕਿਤਾਬ    Livre    本  Libro

-Brenda, Reference Services

 

 

Книга      ਕਿਤਾਬ    Livre    本  Libro

Successful Book Club Authors with New Releases

It is not easy to find a book that everyone will enjoy reading and look forward to discussing.  Therefore, I am happy to report that some authors we have turned to for successful book discussions are releasing new books.  Here are five new titles, you may want to consider:

A Bridge Across the Ocean by Susan Meissner

Brette Caslake visits the haunted Queen Mary and makes a discovery that will help solve a 70-year old tragedy involving two European war brides who sailed on the same vessel to New York Harbor in 1946.

 

Carnegie’s Maid by Marie Benedict             Release Date: 1/16/18

With captivating insight and heart, Carnegie’s Maid tells the story of one brilliant woman who may have spurred Andrew Carnegie’s transformation from ruthless industrialist into the world’s first true philanthropist.

 

Everybody’s Son by Thrity Umrigar

An African American lawman struggles to come to terms with the moral fallout of crimes committed by his loved ones when he learns that he was wrongly taken from his biological mother and that his white foster father exploited their family’s influence to retain custody.

The Horse Dancer by Jojo Moyes

When her grandfather is ill, her life takes an unexpected turn, forcing Sarah, and her horse Boo, to rely on Natasha, a lawyer whose job is to represent the best interests of children.

 

 

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng Release Date: 9/12/17

Fighting an ugly custody battle with an artistic tenant who has little regard for the strict rules of their progressive Cleveland suburb, a straitlaced family woman who is seeking to adopt a baby becomes obsessed with exposing the tenant’s past, only to trigger devastating consequences for both of their families.

All summaries are from the publishers.    

This article first appeared in Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider,  July 2017 issue.                                                 

-Jean S., Readers’ Services

 

The 4th of July

The Fourth of July. Normally, the words just slip out of my mouth with little thought. But recently I was at the Fire Island National Seashore. Did you know that the home of one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence is right here? The house is operated by the National Park Service as part of the Fire Island National Seashore.

The Floyd family was on Long Island in the 1600s. By 1724 Nicoll Floyd had begun construction of the “Old Mastic House”. Nicoll’s son, William, who inherited the house, was active in local politics representing New York in both the First and Second Continental Congress. On August 2, 1776 the 41-year-old William Floyd was the first NY delegate to sign the Declaration of Independence. Of course, this caused his family to go into exile in Connecticut while he served in the Continental Congress. When the war ended and he returned to Long Island, he found his estate ruined and his house unlivable. William Floyd soon handed over the Long Island estate to his son, Nicholl, and moved to Oneida County. The house has been expanded over the years and has welcomed such luminaries as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. The family continued to own the property until 1976 when it was given to the NPS.

The house itself is open for guided tours….but the grounds can be explored for free. There are several outbuildings to be seen and the family cemetery which includes the graves of several family slaves.

On this celebration of our 231th birthday there are many locations where you can experience and celebrate the early founders of our country from John Adams’ home in Quincy, Massachusetts to Washington’s Mount Vernon and Jefferson’s Monticello to James Madison’s Montpelier. But you don’t need to travel to far off Massachusetts or Virginia (or other places). Just drive to Mastic Beach!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

April is National Poetry Month…

Do you like poetry? Come up to the Library’s third floor to sample a new poem. We have a bucket filled with copies of poetry for you to enjoy.

Can’t visit the library in person? May I suggest visiting the Library of Congress online? The venerable LC has so many hidden treasures. This month I suggest looking at Poetry 180.

This project by former Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a selection of poems for each day in the school year. Its target audience is high school students but it is open to everyone. It is a great way to discover new poets and their works:  “The Bagel” made me smile; every parent can identify with “To a Daughter Leaving Home.”

Poems are wonderful to read but they are even better when you hear them. So check out the LC’s Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature. This amazing source has audio recordings of many famous poets as well as lectures about poetry. There is an interview with Robert Frost (1959) which includes him reading some of his work. And Archibald MacLeish reads and comments on his poetry in 1963. You also can hear Margaret Atwood, Alan Dugan (I just discovered his “On the Long Island Railroad System”), Joyce Carol Oates, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Pinsky and Gwendolyn Brooks.

The Poetry Foundation  is another great resource. You can listen to the works by such people as Dylan Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar, John Dunne,Gerard Manley Hopkins and Robert Frost   You can search the Foundation’s collection of poems. They have a section of poems under 25 lines  and another section of poems by literary forms and terms.

Glance at any of these sites and you just might be inspired to write a line or two of poetry yourself. Or you might discover a discover something special! I liked this one by the 17thcentury poet Duchess of Newcastle Margaret Cavendish, “An Apology for Her Poetry.” It ends with the lines:

“Consider, pray, gold hath no life therein.”

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

20 & 30-Something Rifftrax Viewing: The Lost Boys

lost-boysThe Syosset Public Library 20 & 30-Something Programs will be meeting Monday, February 27th at 7PM. We will be hosting Rifftrax Viewing: The Lost Boys. Brief summary of the film: When Same, Michael, and their mother move to Santa Carla, California, strange things begin to happen. A new twist on the familiar vampire story.

Join us in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the 1987 vampire film. Rifftrax are comedy audio commentaries featuring Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K) comedians that are played over movies, television programs, and short films. This viewing will include commentary from MST3K comedies Cole Stratton and Janet Varney.

This program is open to 20-Somethings/30-Somethings looking for a fun event.

No registration is required and the program is free. Non-Syosset residents are welcome.

Please call 516-921-7161 x 239 for details.

This event will be hosted by Jessikah Chautin and Stacey Levine, 20 & 30-Something Librarians.

 

teens readingDon’t forget – Friend us on Facebook: Syosset Public Library 20 & 30-Something Programs. Or check out our meetup group more programs.

Look forward to seeing you there!

-posted by Stacey, Readers’ Services

Evening Book Discussion

orphan-masters-son

2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Winner

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

7:30 PM

with Jean Simpson, Readers’ Services Librarian

“The son of a singer mother whose career forcibly separated her from her family and an influential father who runs an orphan work camp, Pak Jun Do rises to prominence using instinctive talents and eventually becomes a professional kidnapper and romantic rival to Kim Jong Il.”

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

-posted by Jean S., Readers’ Services Librarian