All posts by syllib

BOOK-TO-FILM DISCUSSION

        Friday, July 6, 2018

     2 PM  

With Lisa Hollander, Readers’ Services Librarian

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Charles Martin, The Mountain Between Us, stranded after a tragic plane crash, two strangers must forge a connection to survive the extreme elements of a remote snow-covered mountain. When they realize help is not coming, they embark on a perilous journey across the wilderness.

This program is free.  

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Lisa H., Readers’ Services

 

Advertisements

Evening Book Discussion

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

at 7:30 PM

with Jean Simpson, Readers’ Services Librarian

“Presents a retelling of the story of Clytemnestra and her children, describing how she plots to murder her long-absent husband for his betrayals and infidelities.”   -from the publisher

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity. 

-posted by Jean, Readers’ Services

The 2018 Edgar Award Nominations

The Mystery Writers of America revealed the nominees for the 2018 Edgar Allan Poe Awards on January 19th.  These awards honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television.  On April 26, 2018, the Edgar Awards will be presented to the winners in New York City.  If you are interested in the full list of nominees, in all categories, you can visit their website.  Here are  the titles for the category of Best Novel:

Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

Forced by duty to return to his racially divided East Texas hometown, an African-American Texas Ranger risks his job and reputation to investigate a highly charged double-murder case involving a black Chicago lawyer and a local white woman.

 

The Dime by Kathleen Kent

A woman from a family of take-no-prisoners police detectives relocates from Brooklyn to Dallas, where she tackles adversaries ranging from drug cartels and cult leaders to difficult vagrants and society wives before a first major investigation is challenged by unruly subordinates, a stalker, a criminal organization and an unsupportive girlfriend.

 

 

Prussian Blue by Philip Kerr

Hiding on the French Riviera when his cover is blown, Bernie Gunther finds himself in a cat-and-mouse game with an old and dangerous enemy before fleeing to Berlin, where he places his survival in the hands of dubious former allies.

 

 

A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee

In the days of the British Raj in 1919, Captain Sam Wyndham, a former Scotland Yard detective newly arrived in Calcutta, is confronted with the murder of a British official who was found with a note in his mouth warning the British to leave India.

 

The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti 

A once-professional killer protects his daughter from the legacy of his criminal past, an effort that is challenged by his daughter’s struggles with the death of her mother and the reckoning of old enemies.

 

All summaries are from the publishers.   

 

*This article first appeared in the February 2018 issue of Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider.*                       

-posted by Jean S., Readers’ Services 

 

Book to Film Discussion

Read the book and then see how it is interpreted and adapted for the screen. A short discussion will follow the film. Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Friday, March 16, 2018 at 2 PM . With Lisa Hollander, Librarian.

This film is rated PG-13.

Adapted from the bestselling memoir by Jeannette Walls, The film, The Glass Castle, a young girl comes of age in a dysfunctional family of nonconformist nomads with a mother who’s an eccentric artist and an alcoholic father who would stir.

-posted by Lisa, Readers’ Services Librarian

 

 

Happy birthday, Alexander Hamilton!

Born on January 11 on the British West Indies island of Nevis in either 1755 or 1757 Hamilton was left an orphan at a young age. He dreamed of military glory to help raise him from his impoverished state. He achieved his dream of success…even becoming the star of a major Broadway musical 200 years later!

Hamilton’s life was changed when he wrote a letter about a hurricane that stuck St. Croix in 1772. When the letter was published in a local newspaper, businessmen were so impressed they arranged for the young Hamilton to travel to the United States for education. And so his career began: aide to George Washington, Delegate to Continental Congress and to the Constitutional Convention, co-author of the Federalist Papers, Secretary of the Treasury and founder of the National Bank. He was killed by Aaron Burr in a duel in 1804.

Check out the books we own including  Ron Chernow’s biography, Alexander Hamilton (which is also available as an audiobook), Richard Morris’s Witnesses at the Creation: Hamilton, Madison, Jay, and the Constitution, and Thomas McCraw’s The Founder’s and Finance: How Hamilton, Gallatin, and Other Immigrants Forged a New Economy. And the classic, Miracle at Philadelphia: the Story of the Constitutional Convention, May to September, 1787. by Catherine Drinker Bowen tells the amazing story of the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

If you find your interest aroused the Library of Congress has a digital collection of Hamilton’s papers.  Among the family letters and his speeches and other writings one document stood out for me: his “Outline for a Plan of Government” he proposed at the Constitutional Convention. There is something amazing about seeing his ideas in his own handwriting!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

National Native American Heritage Month

President Trump has issued a proclamation setting November as National Native American Heritage Month. In this he follows in the tradition begun in 1976 when Congress authorized President Ford to proclaim a week honoring Native Americans.

012132.000; Treaties; Detail;

The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of the American Indian has some fascinating online exhibits.  Take a look at the exhibit on the treaties between the nations and the U.S. government. The Museum also has an online exhibit, “Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our Nation’s Armed Forces,” which spotlights Native Americans’ participation in the military from the Revolutionary War to today (when they are today serving at a higher rate in proportion to their population than any other ethnic group). Since we celebrate Veterans day as well this month, consider the World War II role of Code Talkers , those who used native languages to communicate securely during World War II. Some of the collections of the American Museum of Natural History are available online: take a look at the amazing work of the Northwest Coast Indians to see beautiful basketry, carving and textiles.

Maybe you want to plan a trip to visit these museums! Or travel to Pueblo Acoma, the oldest continuously occupied community in the United States situated atop a 367-foot bluff between Albuquerque and Gallup, New Mexico. Or check out the archaeological and architectural wonders of Chaco Canyon (founded around 850 AD) or the impressive cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde Closer to home is Fort Stanwix , which was built on traditional Oneida land.

Locally, the Garvies Point Museum in Glen Cove will be hosting a Native American Feast  on November 18-19 which will feature pottery making and dugout canoe building in addition to cooking displays and samples.

Acoma Pueblo (Bob Ayre)

The Syosset Library has many books about contemporary art (try Native American Painters of the 20th Century or North American Indian Art), philosophy (Wisdom of the Native Americans or Standing in the Light: A Lakota Way of Seeing), history (American Nations, or In the Hands of the Great Spirit). Jack Weatherford’s Indian Givers and Native Roots look at contributions to United States history and culture. There are many more books about art, culture, folklore, history as well as biographies.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

New York Women’s Suffrage Centennial

New York Women’s Suffrage Centennial. It sounds like another dry commemoration. But there was serious suffragette activity right here on Long Island led by local women…as close as Cold Spring Harbor!

We’ve all heard of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but our local ‘heroine’ was Rosalie Gardiner Jones. Called The General, she used her family’s prestige and wealth to push for the right for women to vote.  That was not an easy decision since both her mother and sister were staunch anti-suffragists! Can you just imagine the dinner conversations in that house? Rosalie was feisty and determined.

In December 1912 Rosalie led a group of suffragettes on a walk from New York to Albany to petition Governor Sulzer for women’s suffrage. That’s right they walked the entire way in skirts, on bad roads and in winter! (You can check a video of the Marchers here) But that wasn’t the end of her hiking. She was one of the leaders of the pilgrimage from New York to Washington, DC in February 1913. That walk took 20 days and covered more than 200 miles. The New York marchers joined more than 5000 women and men from around the country on the eve of President Wilson’s inauguration to present their demands.

Rosalie Jones

Since the suffragettes knew they had to keep attention focused on their cause, Rosalie took another high flying publicity stunt. Literally! She boarded a biplane and flew over the crowds of an airshow distributing suffrage literature from the air.

New York did grant women the right to vote in November 1917. (All of the Long Island legislators voted in favor of suffrage!) But it wasn’t until 1920 that the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote nationwide. It certainly took a long time for the country to get behind the legislation that Wyoming had enacted in 1869.

Rosalie Jones might have been a footnote in history but she will be well represented on Election Day.  Her image will be on a sticker given to New York voters that day.

For more information check out books by two local authors. Antonia Petrash’s Long Island and the Woman Suffrage Movement details the work of Rosalie Jones and other local suffragettes. For example, Edna Kearns drove her wagon called the Spirit of ’76 to spread the message throughout local communities and she used her editorial position at the Brooklyn Daily Eagle to publicize the suffrage movement. Natalie Naylor’s Women in Long Island’s Past is another resource to consult.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services