All posts by syllib

Commemorating the Centennial of the Death of Theodore Roosevelt Today

January 6, 1919. Theodore Roosevelt died around 4 a.m. at his beloved home, Sagamore Hill home. He had been a NYS Assemblyman, NYC Police Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Colonel of the Rough Riders, NY Governor and U.S. Vice President assuming the office of President when William McKinley was assassinated. And he won the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating peace after the Russo-Japanese War. These were his official roles. He was also a rancher, a hunter, a conservationist, and an author (more than 30 books and somewhere around 150,000 letters).

Hard to believe that he was only 60 when he died. He left a legacy of civic engagement, conservation and an active lifestyle.

The Bismarck (North Dakota) Tribune eulogized him on its front page: “In the passing of Theodore Roosevelt the world loses a man. No matter how widely opinions may differ as to his politics and his methods, there is universal appreciation of those sterling qualities of virile manhood …. The life of Theodore Roosevelt marks an epoch in the development of America. He lived earnestly and sincerely. …His memory will be cherished for his genuine Americanism, his unswerving loyalty and his devotion to the public weal.”

Some Theodore Roosevelt related activities:

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    Visit our first floor book display of his life and work.

  • Join the Syosset library for a book discussion of Mark Lee Gardner’s Rough Riders January 8 at 7:30 p.m.
  • On Thursday January 17 at 2 we will have a lecture on “Roosevelt’s Life and Legacy”.
  • Roosevelt’s Oyster Bay home, Sagamore Hill, is a short drive away.
  • A train ride away is the NYC American Museum of Natural History (of which his father was a founder) where he contributed many species of birds, mammals, and amphibians he had collected during a 1914 trip to the Brazilian jungles.
  • Or start planning a summer vacation to see his profile at Mount Rushmore and his Elkhorn cabin at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Be careful of the bison out there!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

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50 Years Ago…

The library has a display on the third floor commemorating the 50th anniversary of the watershed year 1968. In a Time magazine article earlier this year historian Jon Meacham compared the year 1968 to 1776, 1861 and 1941 as a time when everything in U.S. history changed http://time.com/5107482/50-years-after-1968-still-living-in-its-shadow/

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It was indeed a turbulent year. It was a sad year marked by the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. There was anger. In January the Viet Cong launched the Tet Offensive. Protests against the Vietnam War escalated with demonstrations on university campuses and at the Democratic National Convention. Olympic runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in a Black Power salute during the Olympic medal ceremony in Mexico City.

Lyndon Johnson surprisingly announced he would not run for reelection. Richard Nixon was elected as the 37th President in November.

 

The Prague Spring began the year with hope when Alexander Dubcek was chosen as the Czech leader promising a government of “socialism with a human face.” But when members of the Warsaw Pact invaded Czechoslovakia with tanks and troops the period of liberalizing reforms quickly ended and totalitarian Soviet rule was reinstated.

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But there were lighter notes that year. Some cultural highlights included the first TV broadcast of “60 Minutes” and “Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.” In the movies “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Planet of the Apes” were popular. And “Hair” opened in London. The year also saw the introduction of Hot Wheels toy cars and McDonald’s Big Mac. The Beatles started Apple records with “Hey Jude” as its first single.

The year ended on a high note with the successful Apollo 8 mission. Astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William A. Anders became the first humans to see the far side of the moon.

Visit the library and choose a book (or two!) from the display to increase your understanding of this time period.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

It is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse culture, traditions and histories, and to acknowledge the contributions, of Native Peoples.

The library has a display of books on the third floor. But if you can’t visit the library and want to expand your understanding of the First Peoples, there are many informative websites.

Check out a collaborative effort from the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, the National Park Service, and the Smithsonian and others paying tribute to the rich heritage of Native Americans. You can see a selection from these institutions from the comfort of your home. The online offerings span a wide range of topics from photographs by Edward Curtis to efforts to save the Cherokee language to the music of the Omaha and a selection from the National Gallery of ArtNative Languages  has compiled information about many aspects of Native culture. There is a list of internet resources for everything from biographies to technology and crafts and histories and you can  search by name of tribe for stories and legends too.

The website of the National Congress of the American Indian  has an online guide outlining the governance of tribes in the United States, Tribal Nations and the United States . You can also search for tribes by name or by location. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (with physical locations in DC and NYC) allows you to visit its exhibitions right from your computer. Fittingly, during this month when we celebrate Veterans’ Day, the museum has an online exhibit detailing the contributions of Native Americans who have fought in every war. Take a look at the valuable contributions of the Code Talkers during World War II.

And it’s not just history. Native culture is alive and well! Take a look at the current exhibit at the Museum of the American Indian’s New York space. Titled “Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound”, it joins traditional art with current media using light, digital projection and experimental media.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Election Day: Don’t Forget to Vote!

Election Day November 6, 2018 is upon us. The Nassau County Board of Elections has list of candidates with party affiliations for your consideration.

You can check on your registration information and get information about your election district and voting location by entering your name and some other identifying information.

The Vote411 site allows you to find your voting place and create a personal ballot to compare candidates for races in your district. Simply type in your address and the races that you can vote in come up. You can compare the candidates (some have submitted personal statements and biographies) so that you are ready to vote when you get to the polling place on Tuesday.

If you want a good look at a candidate’s biography, voting record, speeches, ratings and funding, consult Project Vote Smart. Simply type in a candidate’s name and then choose the topic you want to see. There is also a tab called Vote Easy; by entering your zip code and then answering some questions and giving their importance to you the site will give you the candidate who most closely match your preferences.

After you cast your vote on Tuesday you can follow the results on Politico. From that homepage you can click on the individual states to see how candidates are faring.

In the 2016 Presidential election only about 6 in 10 eligible voters cast their ballots. In the previous midterms (2010 and 2014) only about 4 in 10 voted.  Remember to vote!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Afternoon Book Discussion

 

“The bond between a responsible, self-contained older sister and her mentally ill, impulsive younger sister is shaped and tested over years marked by the loss of their mother, an impetuous first marriage, a fling that results in the birth of a baby and painful sacrifices.” -from the publisher

Tuesday

October 23, 2018

1:30 PM

with Jean Simpson, Readers’ Services Librarian

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

  Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jean S.. Readers’ Services

October is Family History Month: Do a Little Research

Thinking about your New York ancestors?

Although Ancestry.com is only available in the library or by paid subscription, several New York State  groups have formed a partnership with Ancestry to digitize records and make them available for free.  There is a helpful tutorial on the NYS archives page.

You will be asked to enter your zip code. Then you can start your search. Either type in a person’s name or scroll down to search a specific collection. Once you click on any document in your results, you will be prompted to create a free account by entering your name, email address and a password.

Be sure to choose “edit search” instead of “new search” while doing your research so that you don’t move into the subscription-only material.  Be careful and don’t click on any of the “suggested records” since that will take you to a page requiring you begin a paid subscription.

This is a terrific resource offering census, naturalization, birth, marriage, death, and military records. There are fascinating photos of NY Civil War soldiers through the Carte-de-visite collection.

You might even uncover some family skeletons in the records of inmates at Newgate State Prison!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

School days! Back to school days!

Heading back to school evokes mixed emotions. There is a certain excitement about a new school year with its new clothes, spotless notebooks and opportunity.

But no one wants the summer to end!

This poem was printed in the Richmond (Indiana)  Palladium and Sun-Telegram on September 9, 1916.

That feeling of the loss of summer’s freedom and the reluctance to go to back to the school routine hasn’t changed over the years.

Another thing that has remained the same is back to school shopping! Each year it seems that the back-to-school lists grows. Now there is Amazon which will deliver right to your door, but you used to go to the store to buy everything. Check out this ad (and the prices!) from the Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch in 1919.

posted by Brenda, Reference Services