All posts by syllib

November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

It is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse culture, traditions and histories, and to acknowledge the contributions, of Native Peoples.

The library has a display of books on the third floor. But if you can’t visit the library and want to expand your understanding of the First Peoples, there are many informative websites.

Check out a collaborative effort from the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, the National Park Service, and the Smithsonian and others paying tribute to the rich heritage of Native Americans. You can see a selection from these institutions from the comfort of your home. The online offerings span a wide range of topics from photographs by Edward Curtis to efforts to save the Cherokee language to the music of the Omaha and a selection from the National Gallery of ArtNative Languages  has compiled information about many aspects of Native culture. There is a list of internet resources for everything from biographies to technology and crafts and histories and you can  search by name of tribe for stories and legends too.

The website of the National Congress of the American Indian  has an online guide outlining the governance of tribes in the United States, Tribal Nations and the United States . You can also search for tribes by name or by location. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (with physical locations in DC and NYC) allows you to visit its exhibitions right from your computer. Fittingly, during this month when we celebrate Veterans’ Day, the museum has an online exhibit detailing the contributions of Native Americans who have fought in every war. Take a look at the valuable contributions of the Code Talkers during World War II.

And it’s not just history. Native culture is alive and well! Take a look at the current exhibit at the Museum of the American Indian’s New York space. Titled “Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound”, it joins traditional art with current media using light, digital projection and experimental media.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

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Election Day: Don’t Forget to Vote!

Election Day November 6, 2018 is upon us. The Nassau County Board of Elections has list of candidates with party affiliations for your consideration.

You can check on your registration information and get information about your election district and voting location by entering your name and some other identifying information.

The Vote411 site allows you to find your voting place and create a personal ballot to compare candidates for races in your district. Simply type in your address and the races that you can vote in come up. You can compare the candidates (some have submitted personal statements and biographies) so that you are ready to vote when you get to the polling place on Tuesday.

If you want a good look at a candidate’s biography, voting record, speeches, ratings and funding, consult Project Vote Smart. Simply type in a candidate’s name and then choose the topic you want to see. There is also a tab called Vote Easy; by entering your zip code and then answering some questions and giving their importance to you the site will give you the candidate who most closely match your preferences.

After you cast your vote on Tuesday you can follow the results on Politico. From that homepage you can click on the individual states to see how candidates are faring.

In the 2016 Presidential election only about 6 in 10 eligible voters cast their ballots. In the previous midterms (2010 and 2014) only about 4 in 10 voted.  Remember to vote!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Afternoon Book Discussion

 

“The bond between a responsible, self-contained older sister and her mentally ill, impulsive younger sister is shaped and tested over years marked by the loss of their mother, an impetuous first marriage, a fling that results in the birth of a baby and painful sacrifices.” -from the publisher

Tuesday

October 23, 2018

1:30 PM

with Jean Simpson, Readers’ Services Librarian

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

  Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Jean S.. Readers’ Services

October is Family History Month: Do a Little Research

Thinking about your New York ancestors?

Although Ancestry.com is only available in the library or by paid subscription, several New York State  groups have formed a partnership with Ancestry to digitize records and make them available for free.  There is a helpful tutorial on the NYS archives page.

You will be asked to enter your zip code. Then you can start your search. Either type in a person’s name or scroll down to search a specific collection. Once you click on any document in your results, you will be prompted to create a free account by entering your name, email address and a password.

Be sure to choose “edit search” instead of “new search” while doing your research so that you don’t move into the subscription-only material.  Be careful and don’t click on any of the “suggested records” since that will take you to a page requiring you begin a paid subscription.

This is a terrific resource offering census, naturalization, birth, marriage, death, and military records. There are fascinating photos of NY Civil War soldiers through the Carte-de-visite collection.

You might even uncover some family skeletons in the records of inmates at Newgate State Prison!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

School days! Back to school days!

Heading back to school evokes mixed emotions. There is a certain excitement about a new school year with its new clothes, spotless notebooks and opportunity.

But no one wants the summer to end!

This poem was printed in the Richmond (Indiana)  Palladium and Sun-Telegram on September 9, 1916.

That feeling of the loss of summer’s freedom and the reluctance to go to back to the school routine hasn’t changed over the years.

Another thing that has remained the same is back to school shopping! Each year it seems that the back-to-school lists grows. Now there is Amazon which will deliver right to your door, but you used to go to the store to buy everything. Check out this ad (and the prices!) from the Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch in 1919.

posted by Brenda, Reference Services

Discover Something New 102!

The National Park Service marks its 102 birthday on August 25. To celebrate it launched a campaign to “discover something new!”

Did you know that here on Long Island we have two NPS units? Fire Island National Seashore (pictured above) with its spectacular beaches and iconic light house as well as the historic Old Mastic House, home of the William Floyd, signer of the Declaration of Independence, is located on the South Shore. On the North Shore in Oyster Bay you can visit the home of the Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th U.S. President, Sagamore Hill.

If you have more time, consider a trip into NYC. You might think of visiting the famous Statue of Liberty, beacon of freedom, or Ellis Island where so many of our ancestors passed through. If you are downtown, take some time to see Federal Hall where George Washington took the oath of office as the first President or the African Burial Ground (pictured above), the nation’s earliest and largest African Burial Ground rediscovered in the United States, containing upwards of 15,000 intact skeletal remains of enslaved and free Africans who lived and worked in colonial New York.

Do you have time for a longer daytrip? Visit the Weir Farm  (pictured above) in Wilton, CT which preserves the life and home of Julian Alden Weir, one of America’s most influential Impressionists. An even longer trip could include the Washington-Rochambeau Trail that goes from Massachusetts to Virginia following the path taken by the Revolutionary War participants as the French joined forces with Washington’s army.

Can’t decide? The National Park Service website has a feature where you can search for a park by State.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt said, “There is nothing so American as our national parks…. The fundamental idea behind the parks…is that the country belongs to the people that it is in process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us.”

Go out and enjoy them!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

International Left Handers Day

What do these people have in common: Buzz Aldrin, Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Caesar, Leonardo da Vinci, Babe Ruth, Queen Victoria, Jimi Hendrix and Barack Obama? They are all southpaws!

“Southpaw” refers to people who are left handed. There is controversy about the origin of the nickname. Some attribute it to the way baseball stadiums were oriented making the pitcher’s left hand on the south side of his body. But others insist that the name originated with boxing.

Did you know: about 15% of the U.S. population is left handed. Lefties make especially good baseball players, tennis players and fencers. And 5 out of the last 7 US presidents were lefties (Ford, Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Clinton and Obama)!

Come celebrate International Left Handers’ Day on August 13 by choosing a book by or about a lefty from our display on the third floor.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services