All posts by syllib

School days! Back to school days!

Heading back to school evokes mixed emotions. There is a certain excitement about a new school year with its new clothes, spotless notebooks and opportunity.

But no one wants the summer to end!

This poem was printed in the Richmond (Indiana)  Palladium and Sun-Telegram on September 9, 1916.

That feeling of the loss of summer’s freedom and the reluctance to go to back to the school routine hasn’t changed over the years.

Another thing that has remained the same is back to school shopping! Each year it seems that the back-to-school lists grows. Now there is Amazon which will deliver right to your door, but you used to go to the store to buy everything. Check out this ad (and the prices!) from the Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch in 1919.

posted by Brenda, Reference Services

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Discover Something New 102!

The National Park Service marks its 102 birthday on August 25. To celebrate it launched a campaign to “discover something new!”

Did you know that here on Long Island we have two NPS units? Fire Island National Seashore (pictured above) with its spectacular beaches and iconic light house as well as the historic Old Mastic House, home of the William Floyd, signer of the Declaration of Independence, is located on the South Shore. On the North Shore in Oyster Bay you can visit the home of the Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th U.S. President, Sagamore Hill.

If you have more time, consider a trip into NYC. You might think of visiting the famous Statue of Liberty, beacon of freedom, or Ellis Island where so many of our ancestors passed through. If you are downtown, take some time to see Federal Hall where George Washington took the oath of office as the first President or the African Burial Ground (pictured above), the nation’s earliest and largest African Burial Ground rediscovered in the United States, containing upwards of 15,000 intact skeletal remains of enslaved and free Africans who lived and worked in colonial New York.

Do you have time for a longer daytrip? Visit the Weir Farm  (pictured above) in Wilton, CT which preserves the life and home of Julian Alden Weir, one of America’s most influential Impressionists. An even longer trip could include the Washington-Rochambeau Trail that goes from Massachusetts to Virginia following the path taken by the Revolutionary War participants as the French joined forces with Washington’s army.

Can’t decide? The National Park Service website has a feature where you can search for a park by State.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt said, “There is nothing so American as our national parks…. The fundamental idea behind the parks…is that the country belongs to the people that it is in process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us.”

Go out and enjoy them!

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

International Left Handers Day

What do these people have in common: Buzz Aldrin, Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Caesar, Leonardo da Vinci, Babe Ruth, Queen Victoria, Jimi Hendrix and Barack Obama? They are all southpaws!

“Southpaw” refers to people who are left handed. There is controversy about the origin of the nickname. Some attribute it to the way baseball stadiums were oriented making the pitcher’s left hand on the south side of his body. But others insist that the name originated with boxing.

Did you know: about 15% of the U.S. population is left handed. Lefties make especially good baseball players, tennis players and fencers. And 5 out of the last 7 US presidents were lefties (Ford, Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Clinton and Obama)!

Come celebrate International Left Handers’ Day on August 13 by choosing a book by or about a lefty from our display on the third floor.

-posted by Brenda, Reference Services

BOOK-TO-FILM DISCUSSION

        Friday, July 6, 2018

     2 PM  

With Lisa Hollander, Readers’ Services Librarian

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Charles Martin, The Mountain Between Us, stranded after a tragic plane crash, two strangers must forge a connection to survive the extreme elements of a remote snow-covered mountain. When they realize help is not coming, they embark on a perilous journey across the wilderness.

This program is free.  

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity.

-posted by Lisa H., Readers’ Services

 

Evening Book Discussion

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

at 7:30 PM

with Jean Simpson, Readers’ Services Librarian

“Presents a retelling of the story of Clytemnestra and her children, describing how she plots to murder her long-absent husband for his betrayals and infidelities.”   -from the publisher

This program is free.

No registration required.

Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Photographs and videos taken during library programs may be used for library publicity. 

-posted by Jean, Readers’ Services

The 2018 Edgar Award Nominations

The Mystery Writers of America revealed the nominees for the 2018 Edgar Allan Poe Awards on January 19th.  These awards honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television.  On April 26, 2018, the Edgar Awards will be presented to the winners in New York City.  If you are interested in the full list of nominees, in all categories, you can visit their website.  Here are  the titles for the category of Best Novel:

Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

Forced by duty to return to his racially divided East Texas hometown, an African-American Texas Ranger risks his job and reputation to investigate a highly charged double-murder case involving a black Chicago lawyer and a local white woman.

 

The Dime by Kathleen Kent

A woman from a family of take-no-prisoners police detectives relocates from Brooklyn to Dallas, where she tackles adversaries ranging from drug cartels and cult leaders to difficult vagrants and society wives before a first major investigation is challenged by unruly subordinates, a stalker, a criminal organization and an unsupportive girlfriend.

 

 

Prussian Blue by Philip Kerr

Hiding on the French Riviera when his cover is blown, Bernie Gunther finds himself in a cat-and-mouse game with an old and dangerous enemy before fleeing to Berlin, where he places his survival in the hands of dubious former allies.

 

 

A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee

In the days of the British Raj in 1919, Captain Sam Wyndham, a former Scotland Yard detective newly arrived in Calcutta, is confronted with the murder of a British official who was found with a note in his mouth warning the British to leave India.

 

The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti 

A once-professional killer protects his daughter from the legacy of his criminal past, an effort that is challenged by his daughter’s struggles with the death of her mother and the reckoning of old enemies.

 

All summaries are from the publishers.   

 

*This article first appeared in the February 2018 issue of Syosset Public Library’s newsletter, The Book Club Insider.*                       

-posted by Jean S., Readers’ Services 

 

Book to Film Discussion

Read the book and then see how it is interpreted and adapted for the screen. A short discussion will follow the film. Books are available at the Circulation Desk.

Friday, March 16, 2018 at 2 PM . With Lisa Hollander, Librarian.

This film is rated PG-13.

Adapted from the bestselling memoir by Jeannette Walls, The film, The Glass Castle, a young girl comes of age in a dysfunctional family of nonconformist nomads with a mother who’s an eccentric artist and an alcoholic father who would stir.

-posted by Lisa, Readers’ Services Librarian