Afternoon Book Club

Please join us on Tuesday, January 28 at 1:30 PM to discuss the historical fiction novel City of Women by David R. Gillham.  The discussion will be led by Jackie Ranaldo, Head of Readers’ Services.

city of women“Hiding her clandestine activities behind the persona of a model Nazi soldier’s wife at the height of World War II, Sigrid Schroeder dreams of her former Jewish lover and risks everything to hide a mother and two young children who she believes might be her lover’s family.” (From the Publisher).

All are welcome.

No registration required.  Free.

Copies of the book are currently available at the Circulation Desk on the Main Floor.

For more information, contact the Readers’ Services Department: 516-921-7161 x 239.

- posted by Jackie, Readers’ Services

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New in DVD

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Fruitvale Station

Drama R

The true story of Oscar, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who wakes up on the morning of December 31, 2008 and feels something in the air. Not sure what it is, he takes it as a sign to get a head start on his resolutions: Being a better son to his mother, being a better partner to his girlfriend, and being a better father to T, their beautiful four-year-old daughter. Then he’s gunned down by BART officers on New Year’s Day in 2009, sending shock waves throughout our nation.

Enough Said

Comedy PG-13

Divorced mom Eva may be falling for Albert, a sweet, funny, like-minded divorce. But as their relationship blossoms, Eva befriends Marianne, who’s always complaining about her ex-husband. When Eva realizes that Albert is the target of Marianne’s rants, she begins to question her own perceptions about first impressions and second chances.

Carrie

Horror R

Carrie White, a sheltered high school girl and outcast, unleashes her newly developed telekinetic powers after she is pushed too far by her peers at the senior prom when they decide to pull a prank on her.

Kick-Ass 2

Action R

Self-made superhero Kick-Ass and sweet faced, foul-mouthed assassin Hit Girl try to return to life as ‘normal’ teenagers, but soon they are faced with their deadliest challenge yet. To seek revenge for his father’s death, Red Mist has re-invented himself as the leader of super-villains. To defeat their new nemesis, Kick-Ass and Hit Girl must team up with a new wave of masked crusaders, led by the badass Colonel Stars and Stripes, in this battle of real-life villains and heroes.

Lee Daniels’ The Butler

PG-13 Drama

Inspired by a true story about Cecil Gaines, a devoted husband, father, and White House butler who served seven Presidential administrations during the turbulent politics and civil rights battles of twentieth century America.

Short Term 12

Drama R

Grace is a twenty-something supervisor at a foster-care facility for at-risk teenagers. Passionate and tough, Grace is a formidable caretaker, and in love with her long-term boyfriend and co-worker, Mason. But Grace’s own difficult past – and the surprising future that suddenly presents itself – throws her into unforeseen confusion, made sharper with the arrival of a new intake at the facility, a gifted but troubled teenage girl with whom Grace has a charged connection.

The Spectacular Now

Comedy PG-13

While Aimee dreams of the future, Sutter lives in the now, and yet somehow, they’re drawn together. What starts as an unlikely romance becomes a sharp-eyed, straight-up snapshot of the heady confusion and haunting passion of youth.

You’re Next

Horror R

Aubrey and Paul Davison decide to celebrate their wedding anniversary by inviting their four children and their significant others to a family reunion at their remote and slightly rundown weekend estate. But the family reunion goes awry when their home comes under siege by a mask-wearing team of crossbow-bearing assailants. The family has no idea who’s attacking them or why. All they know for certain is that nobody is safe.

- posted by Ralph, Media Services

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About Our Reading – 2013 #5

about our reading 2013 3

In December I asked our staff if they wouldn’t mind answering some questions about the books they read in 2013. We’ll be sharing their responses to various questions here on this blog, a few every day.  So keep coming back to find out how our reading went in 2013.

Was there a book you read in 2013 that you were looking forward to and were disappointed by?

not so greatBurnt Offerings by Laurell K. Hamilton – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson – I really wanted to love this one based on the blurb, but I just couldn’t get into it. I got about halfway through and while I enjoyed Carson’s writing style, the characters just never came alive for me. – Erica, Reference Librarian

There were two.  I had never read a book by Mary Higgins Clark until this year when I finally got around to it. I usually find that there is something that’s good about the writing of those ultra-popular authors  that will draw me in,  but I found Clark’s book unbearable and had to abandon it.  I won’t say which one.  And although I enjoyed it, The Rosie Project by  Graeme Simsion, did not live up to it’s pre-pub hype. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini – Neela, Head of Acquisitions and Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Bellman and Black by Diana Setterfield – Ed, Head of Reference Services

Songs of Willow Frost by Jamie Ford – Audrey, Media Clerk

The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

My American Revolution by Robert Sullivan – Brenda, Reference Librarian

The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls by Anton DiScalfani – Pam M., Head of Programming

Was there a book you read in 2013 that you were surprised that you liked so much?

kid with glasses readingSisterland by Curits Sittenfeld – Pam M., Head of Programming

The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real Magic by Emily Croy Barker – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn – Pam S., Reference Librarian

Although I expected the book to be good, I never expected to enjoy The Cuckoo’s Calling as much as I did.  I know I will continue to read Galbraith/Rowling’s mystery series for as long as she continues to write them. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Telling the Bees by Peggy Hesketh – Ed, Head of Reference Services

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes.  I didn’t think it would live up to all the hype, but it did.  Glad I took the time to read it. – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra – Audrey, Media Clerk

Sycamore Row by John Grisham – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Did you re-read any book in 2013?

rereadA Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines. An unbelievable book! – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather – Brenda, Reference Librarian

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – Pam S., Reference Librarian

Fire Hawk by Justine Dare. Third in a trilogy that will likely be rereleased in e-form next year, this book is actually the first story chronologically, and the best one. A particular side character, the hero’s best friend, has had a place in my heart for years. There are rumors that his story will see print sometime next year as well. – Erica, Reference Librarian

Serpico by Peter Maas – Amy, Children’s Librarian

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie.  Just as good the second time around even though I knew whodunit! – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

- posted by Sonia, Readers’ Services

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About Our Reading – 2013 #4

about our reading 2013 3

In December I asked our staff if they wouldn’t mind answering some questions about the books they read in 2013. We’ll be sharing their responses to various questions here on this blog, a few every day.  So keep coming back to find out how our reading went in 2013. Today we talk about some of the physical aspects of the books we read last year.

Did you have a favorite book cover in 2013?

white vespaWhite Vespa by Kevin Oderman, I’d like to climb those stairs and find out what’s up there or maybe knock on one of the doors.  I don’t think I even want to read this book, what’s inside cannot possibly be as intriguing as this cover is to me. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

middle kingdomThe Middle Kingdom: Two Brothers, Two Motorcycles, One Epic Journey Around China by Colin Pyle and Ryan Pyle – Neela, Head of Acquisitions

are you experiencedAre You Experienced? by Jordan Sonnenblick – Ed, Head of Reference Services

my educationMy Education by Susan Choi – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Golem and the JinniThe Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

What was the longest book you read in 2013?

thick bookA Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin  – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Sycamore Row by John Grisham – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Winter of the World by Ken Follett – Betty P., Reference Librarian

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt – Audrey, Media Clerk

The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island by Mac K. Griswold – Brenda, Reference Librarian

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Winner: The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in  a Storm-ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink – Amy, Children’s Librarian

What was the shortest book you read in 2013?

short bookThe Reason I Jump by  Naoki Higashida- Amy, Children’s Librarian and Audrey, Media Clerk

I Could Pee on This: and other Poems by Cats by Francesco Marciuliano – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

The Rosie Project by Graeme C.  Simsion – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

A Very Short Tour of the Mind: 21 Short Walks Around the Human Brain by Michael Corballis- and it was! -Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

- posted by Sonia, Readers’ Services

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About Our Reading – 2013 #3

about our reading 2013 3

In December I asked our staff if they wouldn’t mind answering some questions about the books they read in 2013. We’ll be sharing their responses to various questions here on this blog during the month of January.  So keep coming back to find out how our reading went in 2013. Today’s post is all about genre:

Did you read a book in (fill in the blank) genre in 2013 that you especially liked?

literary genresMystery: 

If you like Irish history, give a look to The Seventh Trumpet by Peter Tremayne. – Brenda, Reference Librarian

Not a mystery, but a suspense series: “The Sam Capra novels”  by Jeff Abbott which starts with Adrenaline. - Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Visitation Street by Ivy Pochoda – Audrey, Media Clerk

First Family by David Baldacci – Betty P., Reference Librarian

magnifying glass over a blue finger printMystery is my favorite genre and my favorite in the genre for 2013 was The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith/J. K. Rowling. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Sandrine’s Case by Thomas H. Cook – Ed, Head of Reference Services

Celebrity in Death by J.D. Robb – the mystery was absorbing and the cast of new characters (literally, the cast of a movie about the protagonists of the series) was fun to watch. Seeing heroine Eve Dallas try to reconcile the differences between friends and actors with their physical similarities was really hilarious at times. – Erica, Reference Librarian

Romance:

Celebrity in Death. The book advanced the love stories between married couple Eve and Roarke while also adding some sweet moments for secondary couple Peabody and McNab. Romance genre picErica, Reference Librarian

Imperfect Bliss by Susan Fales-Hill – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

I like reading historical romances where the characters somehow seem to have somewhat current sensibilities and the author makes it work.  Between the Duke and the Deep Blue Sea by Sophie Nash was one I liked a lot in 2013. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Non-Fiction:

Let’s Get Digital by David Gaughran. An overview on how to write and market a successful e-book, Gaughran takes real-world success stories and interviews authors who have done well for themselves, but he also goes into a lot of the technical stuff that comes after you’ve written a novel and before you put it up for sale. - Erica, Reference Librarian

The Science of Sin : The Psychology of the Seven Deadlies (and Why They Are So Good For You) by Simon M. Laham – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

Etched in Sand : A True Story of Five Siblings Who Survived an Unspeakable Childhood on Long Island by Regina CalcaterraNeela, Head of Acquistions and Amy, Children’s Librarian

high bookstackMidnight in Peking: How The Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China by Paul French – Audrey, Media Clerk

Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley and David Kelley – Pam M., Head of Programming

Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard by Liz Murray and Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Young Adult:

Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly – Pam S., Reference Librarian

The Runaway King by Jennifer A. Neilsen – a young adult fantasy novel. While not as cleverly written as the first one in the series (The False Prince), it sets up well for the third book in the trilogy while still being a fun, entertaining read. The main protagonist, Sage, is supposed to be exceedingly smart and cunning, and for once, the author is able to actually make you believe this. I find that often these types of characters fall flat because the author can’t write as cunningly as the character is supposed to be. Not so here. – Erica, Reference Librarian

Historical Fiction:

I do love my history. I read more Civil War books because of the anniversary of the Battle of Gettyburg. And even enjoyed two historical novels of the period: Anne Perry’s Slaves of Obsession and Michael Sharra’s The Killer Angels. – Brenda, Reference Librarian

The End of the Point by Elizabeth Graver – Ed, Head of Reference Services

Biographical Fiction:

The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin, Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Fowler and Fever by Mary Beth Keane – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

Book in Verse:

Dogfight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse by Calvin Trillin – Audrey, Media Clerk

Short Stories:

Nine Inches by Tom Perrotta – Pam M., Head of Programming

- posted by Sonia, Readers’ Services

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New in DVD

fast and furious 6Fast and Furious 6

PG-13 Action

Following their successful Rio heist, Dom and his crew have retired around the world. But their inability to return home and living forever on the lam has left their lives incomplete. Hobbs asks Dom and Brian to help him take down an organization of lethally skilled mercenary drivers. In return, their crew will receive full pardons and be allowed to return home. Also available in Blu-Ray DVD.

Despicable Me 2

despicable me 2PG Comedy

Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal. An all-new comedy adventure featuring the return of former super-villain Gru, his adorable girls, the unpredictably hilarious Minions, and a host of new and outrageously funny characters.

- posted by Ralph, Media Services

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About Our Reading – 2013 #2

about our reading 2013 3Earlier this month I asked our staff if they wouldn’t mind answering some questions about the books they read in 2013. We’ll be sharing their responses to various questions here on this blog, a few every day.  So keep coming back to find out how our reading went in 2013.

Which book that you read in 2013 are you most likely to recommend to others?

HAVE I GOT A BOOKIf someone wants a mystery: The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith/J. K. Rowling, for light fiction: Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan and for literary fiction: The Ghost Writer by Philip Roth. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Visitation Street by Ivy Pochoda – Ed, Head of Reference Services

This is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper – Pam M., Head of Programming

Fearless by Cornelia Funke – start with the first one, Reckless, and keep going; her whimsical writing style and fantastic world building will absorb you from the first page. – Erica, Reference Services Librarian

Fall of Giants and Winter of the World, both by Ken Follett. – Betty P., Reference Services Librarian

The Circle by Dave Eggers  - Amy, Children’s Services Librarian

Calling Me Home by Julie Kibler – Audrey, Media Clerk

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri and I Am Malala : The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai. – Neela, Head of Acquisitions

Dark Witch by Nora Roberts, A Hundred Summers by Beatriz Williams and The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes and The Silent Wife by A. S. A. Harrison. – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes, Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan and Wise Men by Stuart Nadler. – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

If you were a member of a book group or a book discussion leader here at the library, what book led to the best discussion in 2013?

book discussion

Breaking night : A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard by Liz Murray – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines read for Banned Books Week in September.  This title offers a wealth of discussable topics. – Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services

The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli – Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian

The best book discussion that I was involved with here at the library was for The Round House by Louise Erdrich, just last month. – Sonia, Readers’ Services Librarian

Did any book make you cry in 2013?

crying woman graphicPlain Kate by Erin Bow – beautiful writing, and haunting ending. – Erica, Reference Services Librarian

Still Alice by Lisa Genova – Brenda, Reference Services Librarian

Etched in Sand: A True Story of Five Siblings Who Survived an Unspeakable Childhood on Long Island by Regina Calcaterra – Neela, Head of Acquisitions

It didn’t make me cry but The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger was very sad. – Stacey, Readers’ Services Librarian

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes - Jackie, Head of Readers’ Services; Evelyn, Readers’ Services Librarian; Audrey, Media Clerk and Betty P., Reference Services Librarian

- posted by Sonia, Readers’ Services

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